Ribollita

This soup has no right to be as good as it is, given that the ingredients are basically cabbage, beans and potato. That it is so good is down to the first cooking stage, the soffritto, which creates the heady flavour-base from which this traditional Italian peasant food sings.

It is a perfect winter soup: delicious, aromatic and filling. Served alongside toasted crusty bread it is a meal in itself, and it’s even better if made a day ahead. Though it may seem strange to use three different kinds of cabbage, the contrast between them is startling: the white cabbage is sweet, whereas the kale and cavolo nero are slightly bitter.

Served in a traditional Tuscan way, the soup is finished in the oven layered with bread. To serve it this way, slice some crusty farmhouse or sourdough bread as thick as your index finger, toast it lightly and rub each slice with a cut garlic clove. Using a casserole or similar ovenproof serving dish, ladle a layer of soup in the bottom of it, top with a few slices of bread followed by another layer of soup. Continue until both the soup and the bread is used up and cook in a 180C/ gas 4 oven for 20-30 minutes until the soup is piping hot and the bread has soaked up all the juices.

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RECIPE serves 6-8

For the soffritto:

6 tbsp olive oil

1 medium carrot, finely chopped

1 large onion, peeled and finely chopped

1 large celery stalk, finely chopped

4 fat garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

2 tsp fine sea salt

a good grinding of black pepper

a large handful of flat-leaf parsley, leaves and stalks, finely chopped

the leaves from a sprig of rosemary, finely chopped

For the soup:

250g potatoes, any kind, chopped into 2cm dice

250g white cabbage, shredded

400g cavalo nero leaves (stalks removed)

100g curly kale (tough stalks removed)

2 tins of cannellini beans

1 litre chicken or vegetable stock, plus the water from the cannellini bean tins

To serve:

crusty farmhouse or sourdough bread, toasted and rubbed with garlic

6-8 spring onions, roughly chopped (optional)

a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil


METHOD

In a large, heavy-bottomed pan, cook all the soffritto ingredients (except the garlic) over a medium heat for around 15 minutes, stirring occasionally until softened and aromatic, add the garlic for the final 2 or 3 minutes of cooking. Don’t be tempted to skimp on the oil, it seems a lot but it is crucial to the final flavour and texture, and only works out at a tablespoon per serving.

Add the potatoes and shredded white cabbage and cook for a couple of minutes, stirring frequently, until the cabbage starts to wilt. Add the cavolo nero and kale to the dish and stir through.

Add the stock and water from the cannellini bean tins, bring to the boil then turn down to a steady simmer and cook for around 30 minutes until the vegetables are cooked through and the potato is just tender. Take one tin of the beans and set aside, the other tin should be mashed with a little of the cooking stock to form a thick paste.

When the soup is cooked, add the bean paste and the whole beans and cook for a further ten minutes to heat the beans through and thicken the soup. Correct the seasoning and either serve straight away alongside the bread, put it in the oven Tuscan-style (as above), or leave it to cool ready to eat the following day.

The chopped spring onions are a traditional Tuscan garnish, scattered over the top when serving, but you can omit them if you wish. Don’t omit the final swirl of extra-virgin olive oil over the top though, it adds a lush silkiness to the finished dish.

Pasta with Roasted Tomatoes, Chilli and Black Garlic

This used to be a lovely recipe, now it is incredible. The small difference, with a huge effect, between how I used to make it and how I make it now is down to just one ingredient: black garlic.

Black garlic is made by taking regular fresh garlic bulbs and heating them under controlled conditions for several weeks. This results in the breaking down of the enzymes which give garlic its characteristic flavour, mellowing and richening the flavour (and the colour) and imparting sweet and sour notes, resulting in something that tastes somewhere between the best aged balsamic and tamarind. It has a reputation in Asia of being a superfood, and the cloves can be eaten as a snack. They’re actually lovely eaten that way.

Here though, the substitution of regular garlic for black garlic results in a hugely complex flavour, full of umami and requiring real self-control if you’re going to avoid eating every last morsel of this dish.

The other trick to dish is to not skimp on the olive oil. It is central to making the sauce so unctuous as it combines with the tomato juices. It’s not one for dieters then, but as an occasional indulgence it’s a real treat.

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RECIPE serves 4 

1kg cherry tomatoes, halved around the equator (not pole-to-pole)

7 tbsp olive oil

5 black garlic cloves, chopped

1/2 tsp dried chilli flakes

1 red chilli, de-seeded and finely chopped

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

350g shell pasta

the zest of a lemon

the juice of half a lemon

a handful of basil leaves

25g Parmesan, finely grated


METHOD

Heat your oven to 180C/ 160C fan/ gas 4.

Put the tomatoes, cut side up, in a roasting tray in which they will all fit in a single layer. Add the black garlic, dried chilli flakes and fresh chilli, and season generously with the salt and pepper. Drizzle with the oil and toss everything together. Arrange the tomatoes, ensuring the chilli and black garlic is sitting in the oil to protect it from burning.

Roast the tomatoes for 20-25 minutes until they are just starting to collapse and caramelise.

Meanwhile, cook the shell pasta in rapidly-boiling water per the packet instructions, until al dente. Shell pasta is best because it provides pockets to catch the sauce, but this dish also works well with thick strips of pasta (pappardelle). Time the pasta to be ready at the end of the tomato cooking time.

Drain the pasta, but don’t shake the colander too vigorously, leave a little of the water because it helps to thicken up and richen the sauce.

Add the lemon zest and juice to the tomatoes, together with the basil leaves. Stir so it is evenly distributed, then tip the pasta into the tomatoes and using two spoons (or tongs if using pappardelle) toss the pasta through the tomatoes. Finish with a fine grating of Parmesan and a good grind of black pepper. Serve alongside a salad of rocket and lettuce, simply dressed with the juice of the other half a lemon.

To make it suitable for a vegan, omit the Parmesan, or use a Vegan substitute.

Prawn and Spring Onion Stir-Fry

Every time I make a stir-fry I wonder why I don’t make them more often. They’re quick and easy to make, bursting with flavour and endlessly adaptable to whatever vegetables are in season.

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RECIPE serves 4 

For the sauce:

2 tsp cornflour

4 tbsp rice wine

4 tbsp oyster sauce

2 tbsp dark soy sauce

1 tbsp toasted sesame oil

For the stir-fry:

1 tbsp groundnut oil

2 fat garlic cloves, finely sliced

2 red chillies, finely sliced

A fat thumb of ginger, cut into matchsticks

400g raw, tail-off king prawns

your choice of small vegetables (baby sweetcorn, mangetout, tenderstem broccoli, fine green beans etc) chopped into bite-sized pieces

5 spring onions, chopped into 4cm pieces


METHOD

Prepare all the ingredients before you begin to cook. Things happen quickly when you stir-fry so you need to be organised.

Combine all the sauce ingredients and set aside for now.

Put the oil in a cold wok with the garlic, chillies and ginger and heat it up over a high heat – this will flavour the oil and protect the garlic from burning while it releases its flavour. When the garlic is golden, add the prawns and cook for a minute until they just start to turn pink, keeping things moving all the time. Remove from the heat and transfer everything out of the wok and onto a plate.

Without wiping out the wok, add another splash of oil and get it back over a high heat. When it is almost smoking, add your vegetables and cook for a further 3 or 4 minutes, keeping it all moving, until they are hot and just cooked.

Add the prawns, garlic, ginger and chilli back into the wok, with the spring onion and the sauce. Keeping everything moving, cook on for a minute before serving immediately with steamed rice or your choice of noodles.

If I am serving it with noodles, I generally cook them separately until they’re just about done, then get them into the wok for a minute – after I have cooked the veg, but before I add the prawns, garlic, ginger and chilli back in.

Chilli Fish with Tahini

I’m a sucker for big flavours, particularly Middle Eastern and South Asian, and I have a particular fondness for Yotam Ottolenghi’s recipes for that very reason. He has a new book out, called Simple – there is much rejoicing in my house.

Life gets hectic from time to time, when it does I tend to turn to less-involved, reasonably quick recipes. So, when I spotted this in Simple I was a happy man. It’s big on flavour, not at all involved and inexpensive as well.

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RECIPE serves 4 

4 cod or hake (or other firm white fish), fillets, skinless and boneless

4 tbsp olive oil

2 red chillies, chopped into 2cm long chunks

3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced

1 tsp caraway seeds, plus ¼ tsp to serve

1 dried ancho chilli, trimmed, seeds discarded, torn into 5cm pieces (or 1 tsp sweet smoked paprika)

1 kg plum tomatoes, chopped into 1cm dice

2 tbsp tomato paste

½ tsp caster sugar

a small bunch of coriander leaves, roughly chopped, to serve

salt

For the tahini sauce:

50g tahini

1 tbsp lemon juice

60ml water

a small pinch of salt


METHOD

Lightly season the fish and set aside.

Put the oil into a large sauté pan, for which you have a lid (I use a risotto pan), and place on a medium high heat. Once hot, add the fresh chillies and fry for 2 minutes, stirring frequently. Add the garlic, caraway seeds and ancho chilli and continue to fry for 1 minute, until the garlic is starting to turn golden-brown. Add the tomatoes, tomato paste, sugar and ½ teaspoon of salt, then, once boiling, reduce the heat to medium and leave to simmer for 15 minutes, stirring from time to time, until the sauce is thick. Add the fish, cover the pan and continue to cook for 10 minutes.

To make the tahini sauce, mix the tahini and lemon juice with 60ml of water and a small pinch of salt.

When ready to serve, if the fish has released a lot of liquid during the cooking and the sauce is runny, gently lift the fish out of the pan and set aside somewhere warm, increase the heat and let the sauce bubble away quickly until thick. Taste and add salt if needed, then return the fish to the pan.

To serve, sprinkle the  ¼ tsp of caraway seeds over the sauce, followed by the chopped coriander. Gently stir to combine then spoon a good ladleful of the sauce into wide bowls, topped with a fish fillet each.

The picture above, which is my preferred way of serving it, shows the tahini sauce drizzled over the dish in the pan. Some people may not like tahini though, if so have the tahini ready in a small bowl so people can drizzle their own over their serving.

Serve alongside couscous and some un-dressed rocket leaves.

Roasted Tilapia with Poor Man’s Potatoes

As the weather cools, my thoughts turn toward comfort food. The kind of food you look forward to on a chill evening when you want something filling, warming and satisfying.

I have been making this simple but delicious Spanish peasant food for years and it never feels to bring a satisfied hum to the table. I like to make a lot of it, far more than we will be able to eat at one sitting, because the leftovers make the base for a fantastic frittata or Spanish omelette for lunch the next day.

This is a very oily dish, and that is its secret. The secret to eating it is not to pour the oil on to your plate or dish, when serving use a slotted spoon to ensure excess oil drains away, leaving only a glistening coat of oil. The unctuous, rich, tomatoey oil that remains can be saved and used as a flavour base in another dish, or recycled as an indulgent salad dressing.

I like to use tilapia for this dish, but any firm-fleshed white fish works – cod, pollack, hake or, if you’re feeling indulgent, monkfish.

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RECIPE serves 4 

4 tilapia steaks or fillets

200ml olive oil

3 large onions, thinly sliced

6 cloves of garlic, peeled and thickly sliced

3 bell peppers, one each red, yellow and green, roughly chopped

4 fresh bay leaves

1kg firm, waxy-fleshed potatoes

a couple of generous handfuls of cherry tomatoes


METHOD

In a casserole, or similar large, heavy, lidded pan, heat 5 tbsp (75ml) of the olive oil over  a medium flame. Add the sliced onions with a little salt and cook gently for around 20 minutes until meltingly soft and translucent.

Add the garlic, the peppers and bay leaves. Cook on the same heat for a further 15 minutes.

Scrub the potatoes but leave the skins on. Cut them lengthways, then cut each half into two or three chunks. Sprinkle lightly with coarse sea salt.

Add the remaining oil to the pan, turn the heat up, and when the oil is hot add the potatoes and tomatoes to the pan. Toss so that everything is coated in oil, cover, reduce the heat and simmer for 40-50 minutes until the potatoes are soft and yielding but retain their shape.

When you first add the potatoes and tomatoes, there will not be a lot of liquid in the pan. By the time the cooking has ended the dish will be braising in the tomato juices and the oil, infusing everything with flavour.

Turn the oven on, to 200C/ 180C fan/ gas 6.

About 15 minutes before the potatoes are ready, lightly season the fish and rub both sides with a little oil.  Place onto a baking sheet and roast for 10-15 mins in the middle of the oven, until the fish is lightly golden and just starting to flake. The exact cooking time will depend on how thick the fish is, so keep a careful eye on it.

You can, if you wish, serve alongside a big bowl of rocket leaves but, really, this needs nothing else other than lots of freshly ground black pepper.

Tomato and Anchovy Risotto

This recipe was devised by Luke Holder, co-head chef (with Angela Hartnett) at a 5 star hotel in Hampshire. You would therefore expect it to be stunning, and it is. He calls it an ‘umami tsunami’ thanks to the intensity of the tomato, ramped up by the anchovy drizzle with which it is finished. The quality of the anchovies is key, so buy the best you can find, and afford.

I present it here exactly the way he wrote the recipe. It needs no embellishment.

This is high-end cooking, which is well within the reach of the home cook. Try it, you’ll be impressed with yourself!

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RECIPE serves 4 

For the risotto:

1 very large onion, finely diced
250ml of chicken or light vegetable stock
250g of risotto rice (I use carnaroli)
190ml of white wine (or vermouth)
500ml of passata
125g of butter, cubed
100g of Parmesan, grated
olive oil

For the drizzle:

12 top quality anchovies, chopped
50ml of Cabernet Sauvignon vinegar
50ml of extra virgin olive oil
2 fat garlic cloves, peeled and sliced
a small bunch of flat-leaf parsley, chopped


METHOD

To make the risotto, add a glug of oil to a large pan over a medium heat. Add the onion and cook gently until softened but not coloured. Meanwhile, heat the stock in a pan over a low heat.

Add the rice to the onions and stir. Toast until the rice is extremely hot, then deglaze with the wine. Remove from the heat and allow to sit for 5 minutes.

Marinate the chopped anchovy fillets in the vinegar, garlic, olive oil and chopped parsley. Set aside.

Return the risotto to the heat, add 2 ladles of stock and bring to a simmer while stirring continuously, until the stock has been absorbed. Keep cooking like this, adding one ladle of stock at a time, until it is all soaked up.

Pour in all of the passata and continue cooking, adding a little more water if necessary, until it has been absorbed and the rice is cooked through. Beat in the cubed butter and grated Parmesan and remove from the heat – it should be nice and glossy. Cover with a lid and allow to settle for around for a few minutes. You will notice that no salt has been added; with the Parmesan and anchovies none is required.

Serve the risotto and pour the marinated anchovies all over the top – this will have a large amount of oil over the top but it is key to the finishing off the dish, so do not skimp!

Grilled Snapper with Sweet Potato Bubble and Chilli Drizzle

I spotted this in an old Allegra McEvedy cookbook, and immediately sourced some red snapper to try it. It was lovely, but if you have trouble finding snapper it works equally well with the more easily-available salmon, sea bass or mackerel.

The sweet potato bubble and squeak is also handy to have in your back pocket when you’re short of ideas. I have specified making patties here, as does Allegra McEvedy, though you can cut out a little work by cooking the whole lot together in a big frying pan, making sure you get lots of charring to add big flavour and a little more texture.

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RECIPE serves 4 

800g orange-fleshed sweet potato (3 fairly large ones)

6 red chillies, whole

6 garlic cloves (3 peeled and roughly chopped, 3 crushed)

4 spring onions, finely sliced

1/4 of a savoy cabbage, cut into 1cm dice

50g fresh coriander, roughly chopped

2 tbsp plain flour

2 limes (one cut into 8 wedges, to serve)

4 red snapper fillets (or other oily fish fillets), skin on


METHOD

Pre-heat the oven to 180C/ gas 4.

Keep the sweet potatoes whole, bake them in the oven for approximately 50 minutes until soft.

Meanwhile, wrap the whole chillies and 3 chopped garlic cloves in a tightly sealed envelope of baking foil. Pop the packet in the oven for 20 minutes along with the sweet potatoes.

Allow the chillies and garlic to cool slightly, then open the packet and remove the chilli stalks. Pop the garlic and chilli into a food processor and add half the coriander, the zest and juice of one lime and a little extra-virgin olive oil. Process until it forms a smooth paste, adding a little more oil if necessary to take it to a consistency that will drizzle easily over the fish.

When the baked sweet potatoes are cool enough to handle, slip off the skins and roughly mash the flesh with the spring onion, cabbage, the other half of the coriander, the remaining three garlic cloves (crushed) and the flour. Season generously and chill for 30 minutes. This is your bubble and squeak.

Form the bubble and squeak into 8 patties – I use crumpet rings for ease and convenience – and dust with a little flour. Heat 3 tbsp of oil in a large oven-proof frying pan until very hot and almost smoking, lay the patties in the pan (gently) and sizzle for a few minutes each side until well coloured. You may need to use two pans. Pop in a 180C oven for ten minutes to heat right through.

Alternatively, skip making the patties and instead cook all the bubble in a large frying pan over a very high heat. Allow the bottom to stick to the pan (lightly) before scraping off and mixing the charred bits back into the mix. No need to put this into the oven, just make sure it is hot all the way through.

To cook the fish: dry the fillets thoroughly using kitchen paper, then lightly oil the skin of the fish. Season both sides of the fillets then cook in a very hot, ridged griddle pan, skin side down, for around 4 minutes until the fish skin comes away from the pan without sticking. The skin will tell you when it is ready. Carefully flip the fillets over and flash for a further minute on the flesh side.

To serve: place the patties, or bubble, on a warmed plate and lay the fish on top. Drizzle with some of the chilli drizzle and serve alongside a simple green or rocket salad, sharpened with lemon or lime juice, with two lime wedges for each plate.

Grilled Fish Skewers with Hawayej & Parsley

Another from Yotam Ottolenghi’s “Jerusalem”, this is a wonderful way to serve fish and is perfect for summer evenings in the garden.

Hawayej is a Yemeni spice mix which you will have to make yourself. It’s dead easy though, just a little grinding in a spice grinder or a mortar and pestle. The marinading stage is essential, try to allow 6 to 12 hours, though if you decide to make it late in the day then an hour will do.

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Image credit: Dev Wijewardane


RECIPE serves 4 to 6 depending on what you serve it with

Hawayej spice mix:

1 tsp black peppercorns

1 tsp coriander seeds

1 1/2 tsp cumin seeds

4 whole cloves

1/2 tsp cardamom seeds

1 1/2 tsp ground turmeric

For the fish:

1kg firm-fleshed white fish (cod, hake, monkfish, tilapia etc)

two bunches of finely chopped flat leaf-parsley

2 large garlic cloves, crushed

1/2 tsp chilli flakes

1 tbsp lemon juice

1 tsp fine sea salt

2 tbsp olive oil

lemon wedges to serve


METHOD

First, make the spice mix: place the whole spices in a spice grinder (I use a coffee grinder set aside for just this purpose) or a mortar and pestle, and work it until finely ground. Add the turmeric and mix well.

Remove the skin and any pin-bones from the fish, and chop into regular 2.5cm cubes.

Place the fish, parsley, garlic, chilli flakes, lemon juice and salt in a large bowl with the spice mix. Mix well with your hands, massaging the fish with the mixture until everything is well coated. Cover the bowl and place in the fridge for a minimum of one hour and a maximum of twelve.

When it comes time to cook them, thread the fish chunks on to skewers (metal or wood, but if using wood then soak them for an hour beforehand to avoid them scorching) and brush each piece of fish lightly on all sides with a little olive oil.

To cook: either place on a very hot ridged griddle pan for around 90 seconds, before turning and cooking for 90 seconds on the other side, or: grill under a hot, pre-heated grill (broiler) for around 2 minutes each side until cooked through. You can also cook them on a barbecue, taking great care not to burn them.

Serve immediately with lemon wedges. These go brilliantly with fattoush, the creamy dressing of which tempers and complements the spice perfectly.

Barley Risotto with Marinated Feta

The first bite we had of this resulted in a collective “wow”. It comes from Yotam Ottolenghi’s superb book “Jerusalem”, and though he has called it a risotto it doesn’t require the constant watching and stirring of an Italian risotto, instead it’s an all-in, one-pot dish that cooks like a stew. It’s delicious, simple and quick to make, there is no excuse for you not to try this one.

The revelation here is the addition of strips of lemon rind. They soften and mellow as they cook, and provide a sharp counterpoint to the richness of the barley. Likewise, the marinated feta adds another taste and texture that elevates this from the merely great to the truly wonderful. If you don’t like feta then try it this way, I’ll wager it will convert you.

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RECIPE serves 4

200g pearl barley

30g unsalted butter

90ml olive oil

2 small celery stalks, cut into 5mm dice

2 small shallots, cut into 5mm dice

4 garlic cloves, cut into 2mm dice

4 thyme sprigs, leaves picked

1/2 tsp smoked paprika

1 bay leaf

the rind of a whole lemon, cut into strips

1/4 tsp chilli flakes

400g tin chopped tomatoes

700ml vegetable stock

300ml passata

1 tbsp caraway seeds

300g feta, broken roughly into 2cm pieces

1 tbsp fresh oregano leaves


METHOD

Rinse the pearl barley well under cold water until the water is no longer cloudy, and leave to drain. You can substitute pearl barley for pearled spelt if you wish.

Melt the butter and two tablespoons of the olive oil in a very large frying pan, or risotto pan, and cook the celery, shallot and garlic on a gentle heat for around 5 minutes, until softened.

Add the barley, thyme , paprika, bay, lemon rind, chilli flakes, tomatoes, stock, passata and 1/2 tsp of fine sea salt. Stir to combine, bring to a boil then reduce to the gentlest simmer possible. Cook for around 45 minutes, stirring frequently to ensure it doesn’t catch on the pan. When the barley is ready it will be tender with a little ‘bite’ and most of the liquid will have been absorbed.

While the risotto is cooking, gently toast the caraway seeds in a dry pan for a couple of minutes until aromatic. Then, using a mortar and pestle, lightly crush them so that some whole seeds remain. Add them to the feta with the remaining olive oil, mix gently to combine thoroughly, and set aside.

When the risotto is ready, check the seasoning and divide it between four shallow bowls, topping each with the marinated feta (including the oil) and a sprinkling of fresh oregano leaves.

In this hot weather our thyme was in full flower so I picked some off and added small flower heads to each dish as well. They were also delicious and added even more flavour.

Sea Bass with Roasted Fennel and Tomato Agrodolce

I spotted this Italian sweet and sour dish in an old Jamie Oliver magazine a couple of weeks ago. It looked simple (it is), uses ingredients that I know work together, and looked like an interesting twist on tradition. If you know Italian food then you know, of course, that the sweet and sour agrodolce is indeed traditional. I looked it up and it is used in a similar way to a French gastrique, adding piquancy to a dish. 

That’s just one more thing that I love about cooking: there’s always something new to learn. More than that, every new thing I discover takes me off down other hitherto uncharted avenues.

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RECIPE serves 2

1 medium fennel bulb (around 200g after trimming), finely sliced

2 tbsp olive oil

150g very ripe cherry tomatoes

3 fat garlic cloves, finely chopped

6 tbsp red wine vinegar

1 tbsp runny honey

50g fresh pine nuts

2 sea bass fillets, pin-boned

2 tbsp raisins


METHOD

Heat your oven to 220C/ 200C fan/ gas 7.

Remove the tough core from the fennel, trim off and reserve any fronds and slice it very finely, using a mandolin if you have one.

In a roasting pan. toss the sliced fennel in the oil with a little seasoning. Spread in a single layer in the roasting pan and roast for ten minutes.

Mix the vinegar and honey together, remove the pan from the oven and drizzle the vinegar over the fennel. Add the tomatoes, garlic and pine nuts, toss everything together and return to the oven for a further ten minutes.

Remove the pan from the oven again and switch the grill to high.

Using a very sharp knife, score the skin of the fish 4 or 5 times each, rub a little oil over the skin and season it lightly with sea salt. Toss the raisins into the roasting pan, lay the fish on top – skin side up – and grill for four or five minutes until the fish is just cooked through.

Take the roasting pan to the table and serve from it, alongside some crusty bread and a simple rocket salad.