Mushroom and Lentil Pappardelle Bolognese

This is a wonderfully rich, low-calorie vegan version of Bolognese, so good that even the hardened meat-eaters in my family love it. The key is to use puy lentils (the dark speckled green type) which hold their shape and bite when cooked, and building flavour through the use of minced mushrooms, a good quality vegetable stock and a rich tomato sauce.

It does take a little time to put together, but most of that time it is bubbling away doing its own thing and it is very simple to make. This is an adaptation of a Jamie Oliver recipe, so you know it’s going to be good…

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RECIPE serves 4 

For the tomato sauce:

2 tbsp olive oil

2 large cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed

1/2 tsp dried chilli flakes

2 tsp dried oregano

2 tins of chopped tomatoes

1 tsp fish sauce

1 tbsp red wine vinegar

For the Bolognese:

1 carrot, roughly chopped

1 onion, roughly chopped

2 cloves of garlic, roughly chopped

1 stick of celery, roughly chopped

2 fresh bay leaves

a small bunch of fresh thyme, leaves picked

4 large portobello mushrooms

100 g dried Puy lentils

400 ml dark vegetable stock

350 g dried pappadelle

To garnish:

freshly picked basil leaves

vegan Parmesan cheese


METHOD

First, make the tomato sauce:

Heat the oil in a large pan over a medium heat and add the garlic, cook gently for a minute until aromatic, then add the chilli flakes and oregano. Cook for a further minute, allowing the flavours to infuse the oil, then add the tomatoes and fish sauce. Mix thoroughly, bring to the boil, then simmer gently for an hour to allow the sauce to reduce, thicken and intensify.

After an hour, add the red wine vinegar and cook for a couple of minutes.

Meanwhile, peel and prepare the carrot, onion and garlic, trim the celery and roughly chop it all. Pulse it all in a food processor, until finely chopped.

Heat a good splash of oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat. Add the chopped veg mixture and bay leaves, pick in the thyme leaves and cook, stirring, for about 10 minutes or until soft.

Blitz the mushrooms in the food processor until finely chopped. Add to the pan and cook for 3 minutes, until softened.

Stir in the lentils, tomato sauce and vegetable stock, bring to the boil and simmer uncovered on a low heat, stirring occasionally, for 30 minutes or until the lentils are tender. Check and adjust the seasoning right at the end.

When the lentils are almost done, cook the pappardelle according to the packet instructions, until al dente.

Drain the pasta and stir it through the Bolognese sauce. Pick the basil leaves and sprinkle over the Bolognese with shavings of vegan Parmesan to serve. The Parmesan is used as a seasoning here, so feel free to omit it if you cannot find the vegan version.

Serve alongside a bowl of rocket, splashed with a little freshly squeezed lemon juice.

Vegetarian Gravy

Most great gravy recipes are based on the juices from roasted meat. When cooking for vegetarians that is, of course, out of the question so, how do you pack flavour into a vegetarian gravy?

The key is to remember that gravy is just another word for sauce, and the French have spent hundreds of years creating and refining the art of sauce-making. Taking cues from that tradition, making a thick, rich, glossy and flavourful gravy isn’t hard at all.

As with all cookery, building flavour is a simply a matter of understanding where flavour comes from, and sensibly layering it into the sauce. The caramelised onions provide the base flavour, the butter adds richness and unctuousness, the wine brings aroma and the Marmite and mustard bring punch.

This gravy is not second-class, it has become my regular go-to recipe. You can (as I have) fearlessly serve it alongside roasted beef or a nut roast and everybody will be delighted.

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RECIPE makes enough for six people

2 onions, thinly sliced

50g unsalted butter

2 tbsp olive oil

100ml Madeira or Marsala

600g dark vegetable stock

1 tsp Marmite (or similar yeast extract)

4 tsp vegetarian gravy browning (Bisto is vegetarian-friendly)

1/2 tsp English mustard powder

a small knob of butter to finish


METHOD

In a large pan, melt the butter with the oil (the oil prevents the butter from burning) then fry the onions over a medium-high heat until they are well coloured and starting to catch. Stir frequently but not constantly.

Meanwhile, prepare and heat the vegetable stock and add the Marmite to it.

Add the Madeira/Marsala to the pan and it should bubble vigorously, for a bit of fun you can set light to the alcohol fumes as they bubble off – just be careful. Scrape any caramelisation from the bottom and sides of the pan, then after a minute add the vegetable stock and bring it to the boil.

While bringing it to the boil, combine the gravy browning with the mustard powder and then add a little water to make a thin paste. When the gravy is boiling, add the paste and stir constantly until the gravy is thick.

Sieve out the onions, and test and adjust the seasoning. You can now leave it to sit until you are ready to eat.

Just before serving, reheat the gravy and when it is hot add a small knob of butter and whisk it in until the sauce is glossy. Transfer to a warmed jug and serve.

Yorkshire Puddings

They are big, they are ugly, and they are light and delicious!

Yorkshire puddings are one of those things that people tend to struggle with. They either don’t rise, or they collapse, or they’re greasy and chewy, or all three. It doesn’t need to be that way, you just need three things: a good batter recipe; well-developed gluten, and heat.

The key is time. If you are going to be cooking a roast dinner at, say, 5pm, then make your Yorkshire pudding batter at lunchtime. If you give your batter a good long beating and then plenty of time to sit, then the gluten in the flour will develop, giving the puddings lots of strength. You also need plenty of heat; heat when you add the batter to the tin, and lots of heat in the oven. The batter will spring up, and as the heat hardens the mixture the strong gluten will enable them to hold up and they won’t collapse. There is no need to use self-raising flour, or any raising agent at all. If you get plenty of air into the batter then that will do the trick.

The result will be great big puddings that literally leap out of the tin. They will have lots of air in them so they will be light, and not at all stodgy. Try it, you’ll never look back!

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RECIPE makes 12

115g plain flour, sifted

a pinch of fine sea salt

2 large eggs

140ml whole milk


METHOD

Several hours before cooking (or the night before, just leave the batter in the fridge) sift the flour into a mixing bowl with a pinch of fine sea salt. Lightly beat the eggs together, and start to whisk the flour and salt gently before you add anything else.

While whisking, gradually add the eggs, with a little of the milk, to make a smooth paste. When all the eggs have been incorporated, gradually add the rest of the milk, increasing the whisking speed. Obviously this is much easier if you are using a stand mixer. When everything has been added then whisk the mixture at high speed for three minutes or so, this will get air into the mixture and also work the gluten in the flour. Now just leave the batter to stand, and go and do something else with the rest of your day.

When the time comes to cook, get your oven up to 220C/ 200C fan/ gas 7. This might not be possible, or advisable if you are cooking something else in there at the same time, but get it as hot as you dare. In a 12 hole metal muffin tray, pour a little vegetable oil into each hole and put it into the oven for a few minutes to get hot.

Go back to your batter and give it a final whisk for a minute or so, to wake it up and ensure that everything is evenly distributed.

Take the muffin tray out of the oven and put it on the stovetop, with a burner underneath it on a high heat. This will keep the oil very hot while you work.

Now, quickly – but carefully – ladle the batter into the muffin holes, filling each approximately half-full.

Quickly again, put the muffin tin back in the oven, close the door and DO NOT OPEN IT FOR 20 MINUTES.

After twenty minutes, you will be greeted with the best Yorkshire puddings you have ever eaten. I promise.