Moroccan Chick Pea Soup

Sadly, I have no idea where I first found this recipe. It’s a shame because it is absolutely delicious, very filling, quick to make and ridiculously low in calories. Somebody deserves credit for this dish, and though I have tweaked it over the years that somebody isn’t me.

You can vary the amount of chilli you put in depending on your own taste, but if you put in just one regular chilli, with the seeds, it will give you a background hum without being overpowering.  Don’t be afraid of using a good heaped teaspoon each of cumin, cinnamon and ras al hanout though, they provide the depth of flavour that makes this dish so good, and none of them are ‘hot’ spices.

Don’t overlook the final garnish of lime juice, za’atar and coriander. It raises the dish from the delicious to the spectacular. Diet food isn’t supposed to be this good!

Total calories per portion are 224 if you divide it among four people. If you are spectacularly hungry then you can eat half of it all by yourself  – that’s a challenge – and still have eaten less than 500 calories. That makes it ideal for anyone following the 5:2 diet.

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RECIPE – Serves 4 

200g dried chickpeas (or one 440g tin)

1 tbsp plain flour

1 tbsp fine sea salt

1 tsp of bicarbonate of soda

1 bay leaf

2 cinnamon sticks

1 tbsp olive oil

1 onion, finely chopped

2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

1 red chilli, seeds in, finely chopped

1 tsp chilli flakes

1 large thumb-sized knob of ginger, finely chopped

1 heaped tsp cumin

1 heaped tsp cinnamon

1 heaped tsp ras al hanout

200g roasted red peppers (from a jar is fine), finely chopped

2 tins of chopped tomatoes

400ml light vegetable stock

1 preserved lemon, pulp discarded, rind finely chopped

1 tbsp runny honey

50g couscous

a small bunch of coriander, stalks only, finely chopped

To garnish:

the zest and juice of a lime

1 tsp za’atar

a small bunch of coriander, leaves only, chopped


METHOD

The evening before, soak the dried chick peas in plenty of water (they will absorb a lot) with 1 tbsp flour, 1 tbsp fine sea salt and 1 tsp of bicarbonate of soda, stir well and set aside.

The next day, rinse the chick peas well, there should be no salt left on them. Put into plenty of water with the bay leaf and cinnamon sticks and bring to the boil, then simmer for 60-90 minutes until they are soft and tender, skimming off any scum if necessary. You may need to add more water as it evaporates. If you have a pressure cooker it will save you a lot of time, cook as per the instructions for your device (mine takes around 25 minutes).

Drain and set aside, removing the bay leaf and cinnamon sticks.

If you are using tinned chickpeas, use one tin; you won’t need the flour, salt, bicarbonate of soda, bay leaf or cinnamon sticks.

Heat the olive oil in a large pan, then gently cook the chopped onion under a lid for around 5 minutes, over a low heat.

Meanwhile, put the cumin, cinnamon and ras al hanout into a small bowl and add sufficient water to mix to a stiff paste.

Add the garlic, chopped chilli and chilli flakes, ginger and the spice paste, stir well, turn the heat up to medium and cook out for a minute or so until deeply aromatic.

Add the roasted red peppers, tomatoes and stock, mix well and bring to the boil. Turn down to a gentle simmer and cover with a lid for ten minutes.

Stir in the chick peas, preserved lemon rind and honey, stir well and season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Tastes good doesn’t it? Just wait, there’s more…

At this point you can set the soup aside for minutes or hours, to allow the flavours to develop, deepen and mellow. Or you can just move straight on…

Five minutes before serving, add the couscous and coriander stalks, stir well and keep at a gentle simmer until ready to serve.

Just before serving, give it a final stir, remove from the heat then sprinkle the zest of the lime over the top of the soup, followed by all the juice. Do not stir!

Scatter the za’atar evenly over the top, and then scatter the coriander leaves over that. Once again, do not stir, the garnish will sit on top and retain its vivacity. Even when you serve, dip your ladle down to the bottom of the pan and come up underneath the soup to retain the garnish layer. It might sound like a nuisance, but your taste buds will love you for it.

Kipper Chowder

I get strange looks when I mention this dish, I’m not entirely sure why because it is just a variation on the Scottish classic Cullen Skink. I threw this together last night after noticing a few packs of kippers in the freezer that were somewhat past their best-before date – 2 years past it in fact…

Before you ask the obvious question, nobody died. Kippers are smoked herrings, and smoking a fish is of course a method of preservation. It obviously works.

I urge you to give this a go: the combination of the creamy broth, the smoky aroma of the fish and the mild onion tang of the leeks is delightful. It’s quick to make and only cost me 55 pence – the cost of a packet of flat-leaf parsley – everything else I needed to make this was already in the house.

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RECIPE – Serves 2 generously

1 tbsp rapeseed oil

1 large or 2 small leeks, trimmed, washed and finely sliced

250g floury potatoes (Maris Piper, Roosters etc) peeled and diced into 1cm cubes

2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

4 kipper fillets

2 tsp cornflour

850ml whole milk

2 bay leaves

a small bunch of flat-leaf parsley, chopped

a few chive stalks, chopped

the zest and juice of 1/2 a lemon

sea salt

freshly ground black and white pepper


METHOD

In a large saucepan, heat the oil then sweat the leeks over a medium-low heat, under a lid, until softened. This will take around 5 minutes.

Add the diced potatoes and garlic and cook for a further 3 or 4 minutes, stirring often.

Put the cornflour into a small bowl and add a little of the milk, stir thoroughly to make a thin paste. Turn the heat up and add the remainder of the milk to the leeks and potatoes, with the bay leaves. Pour the cornflour paste into the pan and stir thoroughly.

Bring the milk to a gentle simmer, stirring frequently, then cook gently for around ten minutes until the potatoes are just tender. The broth should be thick and creamy, coating the back of a spoon.

Meanwhile, take the skin off the kippers and chop the fillets into 2cm chunks.

When the potatoes are ready, add the fish to the broth, bring back to a simmer, then remove from the heat, cover and set aside for ten minutes. The fish will gently poach with no danger of it overcooking.

When ready to serve, add the chopped herbs and lemon juice. Stir thoroughly and check the seasoning carefully – you are unlikely to need much salt. Add a few good grindings of black pepper, and a little fresh ground white pepper as well (if you have it).

Serve with a little crusty bread, that’s all it needs.

Wild Garlic and Spinach Soup

Spring is here in all but name, and with it comes one of the first delights of the year: wild garlic. Easily identifiable and quite prolific, it smells and tastes like a mild version of the more familiar garlic bulb. For hints and tips on how to find and identify it, see here.

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The season is short, just a few weeks, and it is already out there so now is the time to gather a few bagfuls, search out as many recipes as you can and wow your tastebuds. It makes a marvellous pesto, just substitute wild garlic for the basil leaves, and I also blitz it up with a little olive oil to make a paste, which I then freeze in an ice cube tray to make handy drop-in condiments to enliven soups and light sauces.

Here is a quick and easy – and deeply delicious – soup recipe to get you started. It comes out a vivid emerald green and if it isn’t the freshest soup you will ever taste then I’ll eat my own arm.

To make it vegan just substitute 3 tbsp olive oil for the butter.


RECIPE – Serves 4

2 leeks, trimmed, washed and finely sliced

1 medium potato, peeled and diced

50g unsalted butter

a splash of olive oil

300g fresh baby-leaf spinach

200g wild garlic leaves

1 litre pale vegetable stock


METHOD

Melt the butter with a splash of olive oil in a large saucepan, add the leeks and potato and soften gently for 5 minutes or so. Add the vegetable stock, then simmer for 15 minutes until the potato is soft.

Add the spinach and wild garlic, put a lid on the pan and leave it for a couple of minutes to wilt down; you will probably need to do this a couple of handfuls at a time. When all the leaves are wilted, transfer it to a blender (or use a stick blender) to blitz it to a smooth soup. Check and adjust the seasoning, then serve. It’s as easy as that.

You can serve this soup with a poached egg on top, which adds a deliciousness creamy unctuousness and makes it suitable for a light lunch, or just with a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil and some toasted sourdough. You can also dress it with the flowers, which are edible and also delicious.

Porotos Granados

This is Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s version of Chilean squash and bean stew and it is absolutely delicious. The subtle mingling of sweet smoked paprika and marjoram is a real education in combining flavours, while the soft, almost disintegrating squash is like a big warm cuddle on a winter’s night.

This works best when made with fresh corn on the cob or tinned sweet corn. For some reason frozen corn just doesn’t do the job.

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RECIPE – Feeds 4

150g dried cannellini beans, soaked overnight (or one 400g tin)

2 tbsp rapeseed oil

1 medium onion, chopped

2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

1 tsp sweet smoked paprika

1 tsp dried marjoram

1 litre vegetable stock

1 bay leaf

750g butternut squash, peeled, de-seeded and cut into bite-size chunks

200g French beans, cut into 2 or 3cm lengths

the kernels from 2 sweetcorn cobs, or two tins

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper


METHOD

Soak the beans overnight in cold water. The next day drain and then rinse the beans well in running water. Place the beans in a large pan and cover with fresh cold water, bring to the boil and boil rapidly for 10 minutes. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 45-60 minutes or until tender. If you have a pressure cooker the job is much quicker; follow the instructions for your own device, but mine takes around 23 minutes to cook the beans.

Heat the oil in a large pan over a medium heat and gently saute the onions for ten minutes until softened and just beginning to colour. Turn the heat right down, add the garlic, paprika and marjoram and cook very gently for a couple of minutes, stirring frequently.

Add the rinsed beans, squash and bay leaf and stir well so everything is well coated, then add the stock and turn the heat up; bring to the boil then simmer for 15-20 minutes until the squash is tender.

At this point you can turn the heat off, cover it and allow the flavours to develop for a few hours – it tastes even better! However, you can move straight on…

…add the French beans and corn, simmer for 5 minutes, then season with salt and pepper.

The only thing required to complete this dish is a few slices of crusty wholemeal or sourdough bread.

Roasted Broccoli, Almond and Mint Soup

This may seem to be an odd combination of vegetables to turn into a soup, but trust me, the combination is absolutely magical.

Roasting any vegetable is a sure-fire way to enhance its flavour, by driving out moisture and intensifying the plant sugars that are left behind. You can use a lot of mint here, the minty flavour disappears when it is cooked, transforming itself into the perfect partner for the intense flavour of the roasted broccoli and garlic.

Perhaps the most surprising aspect of this soup is just how filling it is. It is super-skinny because it uses very little oil, and there is no potato here to thicken it and add bulk; the almonds do that job, but even though there are so few of them this is a big, hearty soup. It’s perfect for winter evenings, but it’s also delicious cold so would make a lovely summer supper as well.

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RECIPE – serves 4

1 kg broccoli (approx 3 heads)

100g blanched almonds (75g soaked overnight)

6 garlic cloves, unpeeled and left whole

1 tbsp olive oil

1.5 litres vegetable stock (approximately)

a large handful of mint leaves

the zest and juice of a lemon


METHOD

Pre-heat the oven to 200C/ Fan 180C/ gas 4.

Cut the broccoli into bite-size florets, and chop the stems into approximate 1cm cubes. Pour the oil into a large plastic bag, then add the broccoli, unsoaked almonds and the garlic and work the bag until everything is coated in the oil. It may seem like a ridiculously small amount of oil but as long as everything has a little oil on it this is all you need.

Turn the contents of the bag onto a large roasting tray and spread it out into a single layer, roast for approximately 20 minutes until the broccoli is tender and some florets are still a little green.

Reserve the most attractive florets and roasted almonds and set aside for use as a garnish. Tip the remainder of the broccoli and almonds into a large pan, then squeeze the roasted garlic out of the skins and into the pan as well. Add the pre-soaked almonds and the majority of the mint leaves, keep a few of the most attractive for garnishing. Add sufficient stock to just cover the broccoli and bring to the boil, then simmer gently for ten minutes.

Turn off the heat and allow to cool slightly, before transferring in batches to a blender and blitzing until it is completely smooth. Put back into a large pan and season, you may need to add a little water to loosen the blitzed soup at this stage.

Just before serving, add the finely grated zest of a lemon and all of its juice, stir thoroughly.

Serve in bowls garnished with the reserved florets, roasted almonds and mint leaves, alongside farmhouse or sourdough bread.

Yellow Split Pea Soup

It’s raining outside, the day is cold and grey and miserable. It is days like these that yellow split pea soup was invented for – one mouthful and you might just find yourself wishing that every day was cold and grey and miserable, just so you had an excuse to make this more often.

This is yet another deceptively simple soup, made great by a beautiful homemade stock, and transformed by the addition of a little mace.

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RECIPE – serves 4 to 6 people

2 tbsp olive oil

1 large onion, finely chopped

1 carrot, finely diced

1 celery stick, finely chopped

2 bay leaves

2 fat cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed

a couple of blades of mace, ground to make 1/2 tsp powder

500g yellow split peas

approx. 1.5 litre vegetable stock

1 tsp Thai fish sauce (nam pla) or Marmite

To serve: 

a small bunch of coriander leaves, chopped


METHOD 

In a large pan, heat the oil and gently fry the onion, carrot, celery and the bay leaves for around 10 minutes until just softened, then add the garlic and mace. Mix well and cook gently for a minute or two, stirring frequently and taking care not to burn the garlic and mace.

Add the yellow split peas, give it a good stir then add the vegetable stock and the fish sauce. Bring to the boil then simmer, covered, for an hour or so until the yellow split peas are soft and the soup has turned thick and sludgy. Keep an eye on the liquid, you may need to add a little more as it cooks. Season when the split peas are fully cooked.

Ideally, at this point leave your soup to sit for a few hours so that the flavours can develop, the longer you can leave it the better it will be. This really works, but if you eat it straight away it will still be delicious.

To serve, scatter with the coriander and eat it warm, rather than boiling hot.

To make it suitable for a vegan, simply omit the fish sauce; it can be replaced with 2 teaspoons of Marmite which has a similar umami nature.

Brazilian Squash and Black Bean Soup

Another in an unending series of amazing winter soups, perfect for those long, dark, cold evenings. This one, again, manages to be so much more than the sum of its parts – put it down to great ingredients, being allowed to exhibit their greatness.

In my recipe notebook there is a little annotation beside this one, it simply says: ‘Wow!’

This is why I love winter, food like this.

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RECIPE – serves 4 to 6 people

1 butternut squash, chopped into 2cm chunks

2 tbsp olive oil + 1 tbsp to coat the squash when roasting

1 large onion, chopped

1 tbsp cumin seeds, dry-fried and ground

1 tbsp coriander seeds, dry-fried and ground

2 fat cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed

2 red chillies, finely chopped (seeds left in if you like heat)

1 red pepper, deseeded and chopped into 1cm chunks

1 tbsp fresh thyme, leaves only

1 tsp dried chilli flakes

1 litre vegetable stock

1 tbsp Thai fish sauce (nam pla) or Marmite

150g dried black beans

100g frozen sweetcorn

1 tsp light muscovado sugar

2 large ripe tomatoes, roughly chopped

the zest and juice of 1 lime

To serve: 

a small bunch of coriander leaves, chopped

50g per person bulghur wheat, toasted


METHOD 

The conventional wisdom is that you should soak the black beans in plenty of water, the evening before you use them. However, after much back-to-back testing it is plain that not soaking them makes them blacker, more beany and flavourful, at the cost of having to cook them for a little longer. How long? Around 90 minutes or so, until they are soft but retain bite and texture – the older your beans the longer they will take. To cook them, use a big pan and plenty of water, into which you have put an onion – halved but otherwise intact – an orange, again halved and gently squeezed, and then put both halves in the water, and a couple of whole, peeled garlic cloves. Bring to the boil then simmer until ready. If you have a pressure cooker then life is much simpler, follow the guidelines for your device but cook them for around 20-25 minutes. When cooked, remove the onion, orange and garlic and set the beans aside.

You don’t have to do all this, but for some reason using dried beans adds more flavour, and when cooked using aromatic ingredients the flavours are amped up even higher; tinned beans are fine though, no need to feel guilty.

While you are preparing the beans, coat the squash chunks in a little oil, season lightly and roast in a 200C/ gas 6 for around 30 minutes until soft and just starting to caramelise at the edges. This is another worthwhile step; roasting vegetables accentuates their sweetness and adds further dimensions to any dish in which they are used.

Put the cumin and coriander seeds in a small pan (not non-stick) and heat gently with no oil for a few minutes until they are aromatic and the cumin seeds are just starting to pop. Tip onto a metal plate to cool, then either crush in a mortar and pestle or grind to a powder using a coffee grinder reserved exclusively for spices.

Meanwhile, in a large pan, heat the oil and gently fry the chopped onions for around 10 minutes until just softened, then add the cumin and coriander, garlic, chopped chillies, chopped red pepper, thyme and chilli flakes. Mix well and cook gently for a minute or two, stirring frequently and taking care not to burn the garlic or dry herbs and spices.

Add the squash, with sufficient stock to cover everything (it may not require the whole litre) and add the fish sauce. Bring to the boil then add the black beans, sweetcorn and sugar, then simmer for 15 minutes.

Ideally, at this point leave your soup to sit for a few hours so that the flavours can develop, the longer you can leave it the better it will be. This really works, but if you eat it straight away it will still be delicious.

Five minutes before serving, roughly chop the tomatoes (as a guide, chop into around 12 pieces) and add to the simmering soup then, just before serving, finely grate the zest of the lime into it and squeeze in the lime juice, stir thoroughly and check and adjust the seasoning. Scatter with the coriander and top each bowl with a few spoonfuls of toasted bulghur wheat.

To make it suitable for a vegan, simply omit the fish sauce; it can be replaced with 4 teaspoons of Marmite which has a similar umami nature.

Red Lentil and Bulgur Soup

This is an astonishing soup; lentils, rice and bulgur wheat are not exactly exciting ingredients on their own, but here the alchemy that occurs between them is unbelievable. It isn’t even that it is heavily spiced to bring the flavour in, the aromatics here are only garlic, paprika, a little chilli and some dried mint, it’s just magical.

I have heard it said, many times, that making soup is the absolute best way to learn about flavour; this soup proves it, and the drizzle that goes over the top hammers the point home even more forcefully.

Warming, filling and deeply satisfying, this soup goes perfectly with Pide bread or Middle-Eastern focaccia.

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RECIPE – serves 4 to 6 people

3 tbsp olive oil

1 large onion, finely chopped

2 fat cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed

2 tbsp sweet smoked paprika

1/2 tsp dried chilli flakes

2 tbsp tomato puree

200ml passata

250g red lentils, rinsed

50g basmati rice, rinsed

1.5 litres vegetable stock

50g bulgur wheat, toasted

1 1/2 tbsp dried mint

1 tsp salt

For the topping:

2 tbsp unsalted butter, melted

1 tsp sweet smoked paprika

1 tsp dried mint

a small pinch of chilli flakes


METHOD 

Heat the oil in a large pan over a medium heat and add the onion, cook for 5-10 minutes until softened then add the garlic, paprika and chilli flakes and cook for a further minute or so. Add the passata and tomato puree and stir thoroughly. Add the lentils, rice and stock, bring to the boil then simmer for 25 minutes until the lentils are very soft and pulpy.

Meanwhile, toast the bulghur wheat, full instructions for doing so are here.

Add the toasted bulgur wheat and dried mint, and cook for a further ten minutes until the bulgur has softened, then add the salt and check and adjust the seasoning.

Add the paprika, mint and chilli flakes to the melted butter, serve the soup in warmed bowls and drizzle a little of the infused butter over the top. To make this vegan, use warmed olive oil instead of melted butter.

Prepare to be amazed!

Celeriac and Apple Soup

Simple as they seem, soups can be a real test of a cook’s palate and skill at combining flavours. This Tom Kerridge recipe is a great example, deceptively simple with only a handful of ingredients, the soup itself is the classic winter pairing of creamy celeriac and sharp cooking apples and is lovely by itself. Add some garnishes however and the resulting flavour combinations are eye-popping, every mouthful offers something different.

I have used pumpkin oil as a garnish here; it’s an unusual ingredient, and quite expensive – though it will go an awful long way. Use it like you would toasted sesame oil, as a seasoning and garnish, and it lifts anything it comes into contact with. A very worthwhile investment indeed.

This soup makes a delicious and filling supper meal, or a very elegant first course.

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RECIPE – serves 4

500g celeriac

1 litre vegetable stock

3 tbsp rapeseed oil

1 medium onion, finely chopped

2 large Bramley apples, or other sharp cooking apples

the juice of a lemon, freshly squeezed

200ml double cream

1/2 nutmeg, finely grated

To garnish (use any or all):

salty, soft blue cheese (Roquefort, dolcelatte or similar), crumbled

toasted walnuts

celery leaves

a few drops of pumpkin oil

sourdough croutons


METHOD 

Heat the oven to 180C/ 160C fan/ gas 4.

Peel the celeriac and retain the peel, chop the flesh into 2cm cubes and tip onto a roasting tray, drizzle a couple of tablespoons of rapeseed oil over it. Using your hands, ensure that every surface of every piece of celeriac has a fine film of oil, then spread the pieces out evenly across the roasting tray. Do not crowd your tray, leave a little space between each piece of vegetable and in a single layer, otherwise some pieces will steam rather than roast. Roasting drives out some of the moisture in the vegetable, intensifying the flavour in a way that steaming does not. The oil coating protects the vegetable from the dry heat and delays caramelisation until the vegetable is soft. Roast for 30-40 minutes until soft and just starting to brown.

Meanwhile, put the celeriac peel into the stock and bring to the boil. Turn off the heat and allow to infuse for at least 30 minutes.

Sweat the onion in 1 tbsp rapeseed oil with a little salt for around ten minutes until softened but not coloured – the salt will help as it encourages the moisture in the onions to be released.

Peel and dice the apples and toss them in a large bowl with the lemon juice. When the onion is soft, add the apples with the lemon juice and the roasted celeriac. Strain the infused stock into the pan and bring to the boil, simmer for ten minutes until the apple has started to break down. Add the cream, bring the temperature of the soup back up until it is just about to boil, then turn off the heat. Using a stick blender, or worktop blender, blitz the soup until it is smooth. Test and correct the seasoning, and grate in half a fresh nutmeg.

To serve, garnish with any or all of the garnishes listed.

Spiced Sweet Potato Soup

There is always a vat of soup in our kitchen; it does for lunches, snacks and sometimes even dinner, on those days when exhaustion rules out anything more arduous than lighting the gas under a pot and putting some crusty bread on a board.

Having soup always available is a useful habit to get into; it means you will never, ever have an excuse for not eating when you’re hungry, and if you have unexpected visitors nothing can be more welcoming on a cold and blustery day than a cup of thick, warming soup. If you are new to cooking, making soups is arguably the best way to fast-track your understanding of how flavours combine to become more than the sum of their parts.

This is one of those soups that started with far fewer ingredients and grew over the years as I learned which flavours would accentuate and contrast the flavours already here. Try it for yourself; use this as a starting point and experiment a bit to make this your ideal soup – that’s the way to treat all recipes.

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RECIPE – serves 6-8

olive oil

3 large sweet potatoes (900g or so in total)

2 onions, chopped

4 garlic cloves, crushed

5cm knob of ginger, finely chopped

4 green birds-eye chillies, roughly chopped

1 tbsp garam masala

1 tsp ground cumin

1 tsp ground coriander

1 tsp ground turmeric

1 litre of vegetable stock

a handful of fresh coriander, stalks and leaves chopped separately

a 400 ml tin of coconut milk

the zest of a lime

1 tbsp fresh lime juice


METHOD 

Heat the oven to 200C/ gas 6.

Peel the sweet potatoes and chop into approximate 2cm cubes. Put into a large saucepan and drizzle 2 tbsp of olive oil over the potato cubes, then swirl and mix everything in the pan until all the cubes are lightly coated in oil. Tip onto one or two roasting trays; be careful not to crowd the cubes, you want them to roast and caramelise and they need a bit of space around them to do so. To ensure good roasting, spread the cubed potato into a single layer on each tray and ensure that they don’t touch eat other. Roast for 40-60 minutes until soft and they are just starting to caramelise and turn dark brown.

Meanwhile, using the same large saucepan you used to oil the cubed potato, heat 1 tbsp oil over a medium heat and add the onions. Gently saute them for around 10 minutes until they are soft and translucent, but not coloured. A little salt in the pan will assist the softening and delay any caramelisation.

Combine the garam masala, ground cumin, ground coriander and turmeric in a small bowl, add a little water, mix to a paste and put to one side for now.

When the onions are soft, add the garlic, ginger, and chillies. Cook for a minute or so, stirring regularly, then add the spice paste and stir thoroughly over the heat for a couple of minutes, ensuring that everything is completely coated in spice. Now add the stock and bring to a simmer; keep simmering until the sweet potatoes are ready, at which point scrape them off their roasting trays and into the simmering stock. Add the chopped coriander stalks, simmer for a further five minutes, then remove from the heat and allow to cool for a couple of minutes.

Using either a stick blender (my preferred option, just for the convenience) or a free-standing blender, blitz the soup to a smooth and even consistency – you will very likely need to add more water to loosen it. When it is completely smooth, put the soup back onto a moderate heat and add the coconut milk. Stir thoroughly and bring back to a gentle simmer, do not boil. Check and adjust the seasoning.

At this point you can either continue to finish the soup and serve it, or switch the heat off and leave it to stand for a few hours while the flavours develop even further.

When ready to serve, bring back to a simmer, add the lime zest and juice, stir well and serve scattered with chopped coriander leaves. You can make it even more impressive by adding a swirl of single cream and a scattering of cayenne pepper. Add a hunk of crusty farmhouse bread and it’s a filling, warming, feel-good soup for a winter morning, midday or evening.