Kedgeree

Curry for breakfast? It may be an acquired taste, but it’s a taste worth acquiring if the dish is interesting and – most importantly – delicious. In my house this is an evening dish, but in truth you could have it at any time of the day.

It is widely believed that kedgeree was brought to the United Kingdom by returning British colonials in Victorian times, who had enjoyed it in India and brought it back as a breakfast dish. There is some evidence that the dish was actually in existence much earlier, as early as 1790 in fact, but that is the nature of cooking – one dish inspires another, recipes evolve and hybridise with others, there is very little that is really new in the world of food. What is certainly true is that Anglo-Indian cuisine first became fashionable under Queen Victoria, a taste that has persisted, strengthened and deepened over the last 150 years.

There are many, many recipes for kedgeree – sometimes I feel as if I have cooked them all. The recipe below may be simple, but it is acclaimed by my family as the best of them all. Everything complements everything else, there are no flashy ingredients, nothing complex to do, just cook and eat.

It looks like there is too much fish in this dish, but kedgeree is a dish that is at its best with a lot of fish – cracking that secret was like discovering the kedgeree holy grail…

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RECIPE – feeds 4

approximately 600ml milk (any kind, for poaching)

2 bay leaves

the stalks from a small bunch of flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped

1 tsp whole black peppercorns

400g haddock

500g undyed smoked haddock

25g unsalted butter

a large knob of fresh ginger

1 long red chilli, de-seeded and finely chopped

2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

1 large onion, peeled and finely sliced

1/2 tsp cayenne pepper

1 heaped tsp turmeric

1/2 tsp freshly grated nutmeg

175g basmati rice

600ml cold water

a handful of sultanas

2 large eggs

freshly squeezed lemon juice

a small bunch of flat-leaf parsley, leaves only, chopped to garnish

lemon wedges to garnish


METHOD

Pre-heat the oven to 180C/ 160C fan/ gas 4.

Put the fish in a large baking dish, skin side up (if it has any) in a single layer if possible. Add the bay leaves, parsley stalks and peppercorns, then add as much milk as necessary to just cover the fish. Cover the dish with baking foil, and ensure the edges of the foil are tucked in tight and sealed. Bake for 16-20 minutes until the fish is just done and starts to flake.

Meanwhile, boil a kettle, add the hot water to a pan and boil the eggs for 8 minutes (until just hard-boiled). Plunge them into cold water to cool, set aside for now. When you come to use them either half or quarter them, as you like.

While the eggs are boiling, melt the butter in a large saucepan over a medium-high heat and add the ginger, chilli and garlic. Cook for a couple of minutes until aromatic, then add the onion and reduce the heat. Cook for a further 6-8 minutes on a medium heat until the onions are softened but not coloured, then add the cayenne pepper, turmeric and nutmeg, stir thoroughly while cooking for a minute, then add the rice and sultanas. Stir again, ensuring that everything is thoroughly coated in everything else, then add the water. Stir and bring to the boil, then simmer for approximately ten minutes until the rice is just al dente.

By this point the fish should be done. Remove from the poaching liquid with a slotted spoon and remove any of the peppercorns that are adhering to it. Remove the skin (if it is there) and flake the fish directly into the rice. Cook it on slightly, stir it in gently and if any more liquid is required then use the poaching liquid to loosen the rice. Check the seasoning and warm a serving platter.

Turn the fish and rice out onto the serving platter, topped with the eggs and roughly chopped flat-leaf parsley leaves. Squeeze half a lemon over everything, and serve with lemon wedges.

Yellow Tarka Dahl

Dahl is perhaps the simplest yet most reliably gorgeous curried dish that you can make. Though lentils have a bad reputation: dismissed as the preserve of hippies and vegans, they are packed with protein, vitamins and trace elements and are low calorie as well. They also make for a very filling dish so they are ideal if you are on any kind of diet. Did I mention that they are delicious?

This dahl is made with chana dahl, which is very similar to the yellow split pea but cooks quite differently. Chana dahl will hold its shape well when cooked, while yellow split peas will go mushy when cooked. That said, for this recipe they are easily interchangeable so substitute one for another if you cannot find chana dahl on your supermarket shelf.

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RECIPE – feeds 3, with rice and a side salad 

250g chana dahl

1 tbsp ghee (or vegetable oil if making it for a vegan)

1 tbsp cumin seeds

1 onion, peeled and diced

3 whole green chillies

a large knob of fresh ginger, cut into matchsticks

3 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

1 400g tin of chopped tomatoes

1 tsp ground turmeric

2 tsp garam masala

1 tsp hot chilli powder

2 tsp ground coriander

a small bunch of fresh coriander, leaves and stalks, chopped


METHOD

Rinse the lentils thoroughly in three changes of water; the water will turn milky and you will know when they have been sufficiently rinsed because by the third rinse the water will be much clearer.

Cover the lentils with clean water, allowing a good inch of water above the level of the lentils. Bring to the boil, and skim off any scum that forms on the surface. Simmer for around 45-60 minutes, topping up the water as necessary, until the lentils are tender. Drain and set aside.

CAUTION: Do not season the water, the lentils will never be tender if they are salted before they are fully cooked.

If you have a pressure cooker the chana dahl will cook perfectly in around 18 minutes, but consult the instructions for your particular device.

Using a sharp knife, cut four small slits in each whole chilli, this will allow the sauce to penetrate and will flavour the sauce as well as tenderising the chilli. It makes them great to eat whole as part of the dish.

Put the ground turmeric, garam masala, hot chilli powder and ground coriander in a small bowl, add a little water and mix to a paste. Set aside.

Heat the ghee or vegetable oil in a large pan, when hot add the cumin seeds and fry for 30 seconds or so until aromatic, then add the onions, ginger and chillies and fry for 4 or 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until the onions are starting to go brown. Add the spice paste and stir thoroughly so everything is coated.

Meanwhile, put the tinned tomatoes and crushed garlic in a blender and blitz to a puree, then add it to the onion mixture. Combine well, add a further 100ml of water and bring to the boil. Season and simmer for 15 minutes.

Add the cooked lentils to the sauce, adding a little more water if necessary. At this point you can allow the dahl to sit for a few hours so the flavours can infuse.

When ready to eat, heat through thoroughly and garnish with the fresh coriander.

Serve with some plain steamed or boiled basmati rice. This goes perfectly with a side of onion salad.

Onion Salad

You might think that an onion salad is the last thing you want to eat. Though I love the harshness of raw onion, I don’t appreciate the fact that I can still taste it several hours afterward. It stops my wife from kissing me as well…

Fear not, this delicious onion salad is not at all harsh, the underlying sweetness of the onion is accentuated and the harshness completely obliterated just by marinating in lime juice for 30 minutes or so.

This is a great side dish to serve alongside any curry or spicy dish, and if you ever partake of the poppadom starter before having an Indian restaurant meal you will be very familiar with it.

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RECIPE – feeds 4 with a starter, 2 with a main meal

1 large onion, peeled, halved and sliced

1 large ripe tomato, skinned, de-seeded and finely diced

4 inches of cucumber, peeled, de-seeded and finely diced

a generous splash of lime juice

a small pinch of salt

a small handful of fresh coriander, leaves only, chopped

1 tsp of nigella seeds


METHOD

Slice the onion, not too finely as you want the good texture that a thicker slice will give you. Put into a bowl and ensure the onion is fully broken up. Splash generously with lime juice and using your hands ensure that every piece of onion is coated. Season with a small pinch of salt and set aside.

Boil a kettle, score a cross through the skin at the base of the tomato, put the tomato in a large mug or small bowl, pour the boiled water over it until it is fully submerged and leave it for 15 seconds. Empty the water, immediately refill it with cold water, empty it again, now insert the point of a sharp knife under the scored tomato skin and pull the skin away from the flesh; it should peel off cleanly in large sections.

Caution: Don’t leave the tomato in hot water for more than 15 seconds or it will begin to cook. This will mean that the skin will re-adhere to the tomato flesh and you will have a hard job getting it off.

Cut the tomato into quarters or eighths, cut away the seeds and discard them, then finely dice the tomato flesh. Place on top of the onion.

Peel the cucumber, cut it into quarters or eighths, then slice away the seeds from the middle (they will make your salad too soggy). Finely dice the cucumber flesh and place on top of the onion.

Chop the coriander, place on top of the cucumber and tomato and set aside to sit for at least 30 minutes.

When you are ready to eat, toss everything together thoroughly, scatter the nigella seeds on top and toss again, then serve.

South Indian Fish Curry with Chick Peas

There is an awful lot of flavour in this delicious, warming curry. It isn’t a fierce curry, instead it is enlivened by layers of spicing and moderated by a little sugar. The real star of the show though is the tamarind; it adds a deep, sour tang to the dish which balances the sweetness without smothering it while the addition of a little lime juice at the end gives it an aromatic freshness. Though I love vindaloo, there is much more to a great curry than just a lot of heat.

The sauce is very bold, so it needs an equally bold flavoured fish, mackerel is easy to obtain and delicious.

A note about the use of fresh ginger: most recipes call for the ginger to be peeled but by doing so you are throwing away a lot of flavour. Instead, ensure the skin is clean, chop away any rough bits and the grey-looking wounds from previous cuts, then chop it keeping the rest of the skin on. You will only know it is there because of the flavour that it brings with it.

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RECIPE – feeds 2

1 tbsp rapeseed oil

1 medium onion, peeled, halved and sliced

1 tsp turmeric

1 tsp black mustard seeds

1/2 tsp cumin seeds

1/4 tsp ground fenugreek

1/2 tsp chilli flakes

a large knob of ginger, trimmed but not peeled, finely chopped

2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

1 tin of chopped tomatoes, and 1 tin of water

1 tin of chickpeas

1 fish stock cube

2 tsp tamarind concentrate

1 tsp caster sugar

350g mackerel fillets

lime juice to taste

fresh coriander, stalks and leaves separated, chopped


METHOD

Heat the oil in a large pan, add the onion and sweat under a cartouche for ten minutes or so until softened but not coloured.

*Tip: Sweating vegetables under a piece of parchment is known as using a cartouche. It is a way of cooking that simultaneously sweats and steams the vegetables, extracting maximum flavour in minimum time.

Cut a square of baking parchment that is slightly larger than the surface area of your pan, push it down so it sits on top of your sweating vegetables and then tuck the sides down so the vegetables are completely covered. Keep the heat low and after a few minutes check to see that nothing is catching on the bottom of the pan, then re-cover and continue to sweat them until they are as soft as you need them to be and the aroma is filling your kitchen.

Add the turmeric, black mustard seeds, cumin seeds, ground fenugreek, chilli flakes, ginger and garlic, stir-fry for 30 seconds then pour in the tomatoes, refill the tin with water and pour that in as well, add the chickpeas and crumble the fish stock cube into the sauce. Simmer gently for 20 minutes.

Now add the chopped coriander stalks – never throw the stalks away, again they are full of flavour that you would otherwise lose – stir in the tamarind concentrate and sugar and adjust the balance of the two by adding a little more of either until it is as you like it. Season very carefully with salt and a little ground black pepper.

At this point you can leave the sauce to sit and infuse for a few hours, or overnight. It’s an old cliche that curries taste better the day after, but it’s true. It’s almost as good if you carry straight on though…

With the sauce at a gentle simmer, cut your fish into large chunks and gently push them into the sauce so they are just submerged. Poach gently for around 8 minutes (the exact time will depend on the thickness of your fillets).

Adjust the seasoning if necessary, add a couple of dashes of lime juice (fresh is always best) and garnish with the chopped coriander leaves.

The population seems to divide equally between those who love coriander and those who think it tastes like soap. Personally I love it and use it in huge quantities – in the picture above I have used only a little, but when it went on the table you couldn’t see the sauce for the coriander. It’s best to be aware that some people might not like it before you use it!

This goes very well with steamed or plain boiled basmati rice, and carrot and ginger salad.

Seared Tuna Stir-Fry

Stir-fried food is the ultimate fast food, taking literally less than 5 minutes from hot oil to finished dish. Obviously, that means that once you start cooking things move fast so you need to be well organised and have all your ingredients weighed-out, measured and chopped before you even think about turning on the gas. There really isn’t much that goes into this dish, but even so it is absolutely packed with flavour. Preparation should only take 10 minutes even if you take your time.

If Chinese takeaway food is your only experience of Chinese-style cooking then you are in for an extremely pleasant surprise, and this dish is a quick and easy way in to a delicious, filling and healthy cuisine. The sauce is what really makes this dish sing, the interplay of the various aromatic components is just divine. Hoisin sauce is the only ingredient that you might struggle to find, though it is now readily available from larger UK supermarkets.

I have specified Ramen noodles here, just because they go extremely well with stir-fries, but feel free to use whatever you have, or perhaps serve it with Beijing rice. The Ramen noodles I use have a cooking time of 4 minutes, at which point either serve them immediately or plunge them into cold water to stop them cooking. If you want to ensure you don’t have too many things going at once it is a good idea to cook them in advance. They can be heated again when you are ready to use them by plunging them into a pan of boiling water for a few seconds. Always make sure you know how long your noodles take to prepare by reading the instructions on your particular packet.

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RECIPE – feeds 2

2 tuna steaks

dark soy sauce

2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

2 servings of Ramen noodles (approximately 160g dry)

For the sauce:

2 tbsp lemon juice

2 tbsp hoisin sauce

1 tbsp dark soy sauce

1 tsp dried chilli flakes

For the stir-fry:

1 tbsp groundnut oil

a large knob of fresh ginger, cut into thin matchsticks

2 garlic cloves, peeled and thinly sliced

1 medium red chilli, finely chopped (seeds left in if you like it hot)

2 red peppers, chopped into 1.5 cm chunks

3 fat spring onions, finely sliced at an angle

For the garnish:

a bunch of fresh coriander, leaves and stalks, chopped


METHOD

Fill the bottom of a dish large enough to hold your tuna steaks with dark soy sauce to a depth of 2 millimetres. Crush two garlic cloves into it, stir thoroughly then place the tuna steaks in the soy sauce, turning until it is completely coated. Cover with cling film and chill in a fridge for 30 minutes.

Prepare all the other ingredients.

Combine the sauce ingredients, stir thoroughly and set aside.

Heat a wok over a high heat, and a ridged griddle pan also over a high heat.

Get a large pan of unsalted water to a strong rolling boil, add the noodles and cook for 4 minutes. Set a timer – everything moves fast from here…

When the griddle pan is very hot, scrape any pieces of garlic and excess soy sauce from the tuna steaks and lay them in the pan. Cook for approximately 1 minute per centimetre thickness on one side, and half that on the other – to make that clear, a 2 cm thick tuna steak would be cooked for 2 minutes on one side, then flipped over and cooked for a further 1 minute. Do not move the tuna while it is cooking, it is likely to stick until it is properly cooked, and you want well-defined char lines where the ridges are. Cooking it this way should ensure the outside is well-sealed and the very middle is still quite rare, the tuna steak will cook on even when it is on your plate though.

At the same time as the tuna is cooking, when the wok is smoking hot add the groundnut oil and swirl it around the wok to coat all surfaces. Add the ginger, cook for a few seconds then add the chilli and garlic and stir fry for around 15 seconds, then add the chunks of red pepper. Stir-fry for 1 minute then add the spring onions and the sauce and bring to the boil, by this time your noodles should be ready so tip them in to the wok and toss everything together. Garnish in the wok with chopped fresh coriander leaves, and serve the tuna steaks on a bed of the noodles and stir-fried vegetables.

Hake Gratin Dauphinois

My recipe notebook has a note beside this recipe: ‘indescribably awesome’. It is.

Perhaps the ultimate comfort food, a fish pie is difficult to beat when the weather is autumnal and the central heating is on – and it’s the end of June.

This one is a bit different though, rather than a mash topping it uses Dauphinois potatoes layered over the top of an onion base with a fish and basil cream filling. Simple to make, and just delicious, it is so moreish it is not a dish you can eat if you are on a diet!

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RECIPE – feeds 3 

500g floury potatoes (Roosters, King Edward, Maris Piper etc)

2 large onions, peeled, halved and finely sliced

2 tbsp olive oil

3 hake fillets or loins (or other firm white fish)

300 ml double cream

a bunch of basil, leaves only, shredded


METHOD

Slice the potatoes to the uniform thickness of a pound coin. Use a mandolin if you have one, it makes the job much quicker and accurate, just be sure to use the guard – I managed to slice my thumb while making this.

Put the sliced potatoes into a large pan in just enough slightly salted cold water to cover them, and bring to the boil. As soon as the water is just at the boil, turn the heat right down until bubbles just break the surface and poach the potatoes for five minutes.

Drain the potatoes in a colander and set aside.

Heat the oven to 200C/ 180C fan/ Gas 6.

Finely slice the onions and fry them gently in a large pan, in the olive oil, for around ten minutes until softened but not coloured. I use my risotto pan for this, I can then leave the onions in it and layer everything on top before I put it into the oven. Use whatever you have though, a large ovenproof dish is perfect.

Spread the onions out in an even layer in the bottom of your pan or dish. Cut the fish into large chunks and season lightly with salt and pepper, then place them evenly on top of the onions. There will be gaps, this doesn’t matter.

Stir the basil into the cream, season lightly with salt and pour evenly over the fish and onions. It will look as though you don’t have quite enough cream, but you do. Don’t be tempted to use more.

Now start laying the potato slices over the fish and onions, slightly overlapping them, until completely covered. Drizzle more olive oil all over the top – not too much – or dot it with butter.

Bake for around 40 minutes until the potatoes have lightly browned and are starting to char at the edges.

Serve with a simple green salad.

 

Carrot and Ginger Salad

This simple, quick to make and very attractive salad is the perfect accompaniment to Indian curries.

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RECIPE – feeds 4 

5 or 6 large carrots

1 fresh red chilli, de-seeded and finely sliced

a 2cm knob of fresh ginger, trimmed but not peeled, finely chopped

a handful of flaked almonds

a small bunch of fresh coriander, leaves only, chopped

lime juice


METHOD

Peel and trim the carrots. If you are lucky enough to have a food processor with a grater attachment then you’re in luck, otherwise you will have to grate the carrots by hand. Put them into a salad bowl.

In a small, NOT non-stick pan lightly toast the flaked almonds until they are lightly and evenly browned. Keep your eye on them as they can burn quickly, when you judge that they are ready tip them out of the pan onto a plate to cool – the pan will be hot and they will cook on if left in it. Remove any toasted almonds that are burned as they are bitter.

Add the almonds to the carrots, together with the chilli, ginger and coriander. Toss thoroughly to mix, and when you are ready to eat sprinkle lime juice over the salad and toss again. Check the taste and add more lime if necessary, a little at a time.

Serve as a side salad alongside anything spicy, but this goes particularly well with many Indian dishes.

Tartare Sauce

Those who read this blog with any regularity will know that I am a dedicated advocate of making every element of a meal myself. I have tried my hand at tomato ketchup, brown sauce, making my own cheese, mayonnaise… anything and everything in fact – if it can be made in a home kitchen then I will give it a go. It’s not because I am some kind of zealot who treats his body as a temple and refuses to eat anything made in a factory – well, okay, to a large degree I am extremely distrustful of processed food of any kind – but the main reason is that I enjoy making new things, and also because when you make something yourself you can adjust its flavour to make it taste exactly how you want it to. There is also the fact that every time you make something new then you can learn something from it. If you want to become a good cook then whatever else you do there is no substitute for actual cooking.

You might wonder whether it’s worth going to the effort of making something as basic as tartare sauce when there are perfectly acceptable jars of it lining supermarket shelves all around the world. If you’re wondering that then you’re reading the wrong blog! Like everything else that you make by hand, the difference between home-made and shop-bought is like night and day. This is dead easy, quick and inexpensive, and because you will probably have more than you need you can store leftovers in the fridge for up to a week.

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RECIPE – feeds 6 people easily

3 medium large cornichons (pickled gherkins)

1 heaped tbsp capers, drained

4 anchovy fillets in oil, drained

a small bunch of flat leaf parsley, leaves and stalks roughly torn

1 lemon, zest and juice

200g mayonnaise

extra-virgin olive oil


METHOD

Put the cornichons, capers, anchovies, parsley and the zest of the lemon in a food processor (or, at a push, a blender), with half the lemon juice and a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil. Blitz until you have a rough paste, if you like a little more texture in your sauce stop blitzing when it reaches your desired consistency. Add a little more olive oil if necessary.

Put the mayonnaise in a large bowl, then add the blitzed paste to it. Mix well and taste, adding as much of the remaining lemon juice as you wish so that it is as tart as you like it.

I have not specified that you make your own mayonnaise here, that is a blog post that will come in the future. This tastes great with shop-bought mayo, and because you are dealing with such strong flavours there is little benefit to be gained from making your own, unless you want to and then you can brag about it.

Salmon Fishcakes

Made well, fishcakes are one of the most delicious meals on the planet. Simultaneously soft and crunchy, mellow yet full of flavour. Made poorly, they can be flabby, soggy, oily and tasteless. It’s obviously best to ensure that they are made well then, and the best starting point is a great recipe.

This recipe was inspired by the Michelin-starred Tom Kerridge, so as you would expect they are full of flavour but do involve a fair bit of work. As a result these are best made on an afternoon when you haven’t much else to do, though I guarantee that once you have found the time to make them you will be yearning to repeat the experience.

Most fishcake recipes involve shallow frying, I have often found though that you need high heat to avoid them getting oily, but then the breadcrumbs tend to burn before the middle of the fishcake is cooked. Far better to bake them, it keeps the breadcrumbs crunchy, ensures even cooking and it also gives you a wider margin for error. It also means they are that much lower in fat and therefore even healthier than they already are.

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RECIPE – makes 6, feeds 3 people easily

3 or 4 baking potatoes – you will need 350g of potato flesh

350g salmon fillets

2 tbsp capers, drained

2 tbsp dill, chopped

2 tbsp flat leaf parsley, chopped

1 tbsp English mustard powder

1/2 tsp cayenne pepper

1/2 tsp fine sea salt

finely grated zest of a lemon

100g smoked salmon, chopped

150g plain flour

2 eggs, beaten

150g panko breadcrumbs


METHOD

Heat the oven to 200C/ 180C fan /Gas 6. Bake the potatoes for between 60 and 90 minutes until soft. Allow them to cool, and when they are cool enough to handle, cut them in half and scoop out the flesh. Pass the flesh through a potato ricer or just mash it, without adding any butter or liquids. Weigh out 350g of the flesh and set aside for now.

*Tip: When you make mashed potato, make as much as you can (far more than you will need) and freeze the excess. It freezes well and it is always useful to have some mash ready-made for fishcakes, or toppings for fish pie or shepherd’s pie.

Season the salmon, wrap it in kitchen foil and place on a baking sheet then roast for 8-10 minutes until just cooked and the salmon flakes easily. Set aside.

Put the potato in a large bowl, then add the capers, dill, parsley, mustard powder, cayenne pepper, salt and lemon zest, then mix in the smoked salmon. Mix thoroughly, then flake the salmon fillets into the mix and fold in.

Divide the mixture into 6 balls, then shape them into cakes. Cover with cling film and put into the fridge to chill for at least an hour.

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When ready to cook, place the flour, eggs and panko breadcrumbs each into an individual deep plate. One by one, coat the fishcakes with flour, egg and finally the breadcrumbs. You can use regular breadcrumbs here, easily made by putting stale bread into a food processor and blitzing until crumbed, but be careful not to go too far or you will end up with dust. Panko breadcrumbs are far superior, being dry and crunchy and bringing a lovely textural difference to the finished fishcake.

Place the coated fishcakes on a baking sheet, and bake at 200C/ 180C fan /Gas 6 for approximately ten minutes, or until the breadcrumbs are golden brown and beginning to char.

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These go extremely well with tartare sauce, roasted sweet potato wedges and a simple green salad.

The empty baked potato skins can be deep fried and served as a starter with sour cream and chives, or your favourite crispy skin dips and fillings.

Sweet Potato Wedges with Paprika

These sweet potato wedges are lusciously soft, and when roasted with a sprinkling of paprika make an ideal accompaniment to fillets of fish, chicken or pork. They are ridiculously simple to make as well, and only take half an hour in a hot oven.

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RECIPE – feeds 2 

300g sweet potatoes

2 tsp paprika

olive oil


METHOD

Preheat the oven to 200C/ 180C fan /Gas 6.

Wash the sweet potatoes then, leaving the skin on, slice them into thin wedges. Place them in a shallow baking tray, drizzle them with olive oil – just enough to coat them – then sprinkle the paprika over them. Using your hands, rub the oil and paprika over the wedges ensuring that every surface is coated.

Spread out in a single layer and roast in the centre of the oven for around 30 minutes, until well browned and meltingly soft.

Be generous with the portion sizes, these are very moreish!