Couscous with Preserved Lemon and Harissa

Often, what you pair a dish with is every bit as important as the main element itself. You wouldn’t, for example, serve a steak and kidney pie with a bowl of steamed Basmati rice. Because we eat a lot of Middle-Eastern dishes, we get through a lot of couscous, but I have to be careful not to put the couscous on the table first, because my family love it so much they will just eat it all by itself.

If you are not familiar with it, couscous are small steamed balls of crushed durum wheat semolina that is traditionally served with a stew spooned on top. You can also use it as the basis for a salad: just add some salad leaves, perhaps some chick peas and always, always (in my house), a little harissa on the side to add spice and heat. You can use ready-made preserved lemon and harissa, but I always use home-made – the links are in the recipe below – and the results are incredible.

This has to be the easiest recipe I will ever put on this blog, in terms of both simplicity and speed. I make no apologies for that, great tasting food doesn’t have to be difficult.

preserved-lemon-couscous.jpg

RECIPE 

75g of dry couscous per person

just boiled water, 1.5 times the weight of couscous (so 112g of water per 75g dry serving)

1/4 tsp bouillon powder per person

some preserved lemon peel

harissa, to stir through


METHOD

Weigh out the appropriate amount of dry couscous, depending how many people are eating. Put it into a saucepan for which you have a lid.

Chop up the peel of your preserved lemon, into 5mm dice. How much you use is entirely up to you, I tend to use the peel of half a lemon when feeding four.

Measure out the appropriate amount of bouillon powder (you can get vegan bouillon, if you need it) and stir it through the dry couscous. Add the chopped preserved lemon peel and stir it through thoroughly. Boil the kettle, and immediately after it has boiled add the appropriate weight of water to the pan. Stir thoroughly and vigorously and quickly put a lot on the pan. Set aside for at least ten minutes, the couscous will absorb the water and the flavours will mingle.

When ready to serve, fluff it up with a fork and transfer to a warmed serving dish if you like. We only ever do this if we have company, otherwise we dig in straight from the pan. Serve with whatever Middle-Eastern dish you fancy, with a jar of harissa ever-present alongside it.

Grilled Snapper with Sweet Potato Bubble and Chilli Drizzle

I spotted this in an old Allegra McEvedy cookbook, and immediately sourced some red snapper to try it. It was lovely, but if you have trouble finding snapper it works equally well with the more easily-available salmon, sea bass or mackerel.

The sweet potato bubble and squeak is also handy to have in your back pocket when you’re short of ideas. I have specified making patties here, as does Allegra McEvedy, though you can cut out a little work by cooking the whole lot together in a big frying pan, making sure you get lots of charring to add big flavour and a little more texture.

snapper.jpg

RECIPE serves 4 

800g orange-fleshed sweet potato (3 fairly large ones)

6 red chillies, whole

6 garlic cloves (3 peeled and roughly chopped, 3 crushed)

4 spring onions, finely sliced

1/4 of a savoy cabbage, cut into 1cm dice

50g fresh coriander, roughly chopped

2 tbsp plain flour

2 limes (one cut into 8 wedges, to serve)

4 red snapper fillets (or other oily fish fillets), skin on


METHOD

Pre-heat the oven to 180C/ gas 4.

Keep the sweet potatoes whole, bake them in the oven for approximately 50 minutes until soft.

Meanwhile, wrap the whole chillies and 3 chopped garlic cloves in a tightly sealed envelope of baking foil. Pop the packet in the oven for 20 minutes along with the sweet potatoes.

Allow the chillies and garlic to cool slightly, then open the packet and remove the chilli stalks. Pop the garlic and chilli into a food processor and add half the coriander, the zest and juice of one lime and a little extra-virgin olive oil. Process until it forms a smooth paste, adding a little more oil if necessary to take it to a consistency that will drizzle easily over the fish.

When the baked sweet potatoes are cool enough to handle, slip off the skins and roughly mash the flesh with the spring onion, cabbage, the other half of the coriander, the remaining three garlic cloves (crushed) and the flour. Season generously and chill for 30 minutes. This is your bubble and squeak.

Form the bubble and squeak into 8 patties – I use crumpet rings for ease and convenience – and dust with a little flour. Heat 3 tbsp of oil in a large oven-proof frying pan until very hot and almost smoking, lay the patties in the pan (gently) and sizzle for a few minutes each side until well coloured. You may need to use two pans. Pop in a 180C oven for ten minutes to heat right through.

Alternatively, skip making the patties and instead cook all the bubble in a large frying pan over a very high heat. Allow the bottom to stick to the pan (lightly) before scraping off and mixing the charred bits back into the mix. No need to put this into the oven, just make sure it is hot all the way through.

To cook the fish: dry the fillets thoroughly using kitchen paper, then lightly oil the skin of the fish. Season both sides of the fillets then cook in a very hot, ridged griddle pan, skin side down, for around 4 minutes until the fish skin comes away from the pan without sticking. The skin will tell you when it is ready. Carefully flip the fillets over and flash for a further minute on the flesh side.

To serve: place the patties, or bubble, on a warmed plate and lay the fish on top. Drizzle with some of the chilli drizzle and serve alongside a simple green or rocket salad, sharpened with lemon or lime juice, with two lime wedges for each plate.

Blackberry and Brown Sugar Fingers

I have absolutely no idea where I found this recipe, it most definitely is not one that I created but I have been making it during the blackberry season for several years now. That is probably the only recommendation that you need, any recipe that you find yourself going back to time and time again must be a good one. I like to use a whole jar of jam in this, it results in a gloriously deep flavour.

I was encouraged to put this recipe on the blog by my friend Bridget, who sampled the latest batch last week and fell in love with them.

blackberry_brown_sugar_fingers.jpg

RECIPE makes 24 fingers

For the base:

225g soft butter
75g sifted icing sugar
225g plain flour
50g cornflour
pinch salt
400g blackberry jam / bramble jelly

For the topping:

125g soft butter
125g light muscovado sugar
finely grated zest of 1 lemon
2 large free-range eggs, beaten
25g self-raising flour
175g ground almonds
200g blackberries
25g flaked almonds
1 tbsp demerara sugar, plus extra for sprinkling


METHOD

Preheat the oven to 180°C/Gas 4.

Lightly grease a small baking tin (I use one that is 20cm x 30cm) and line with baking parchment.

First make the base: cream the butter and icing sugar together in a bowl until pale and fluffy. Sift over the flour, cornflour and salt and stir into the butter mixture to make a soft, shortbread-like dough.

Roll the dough out on a lightly floured surface almost to the size of the tin, lower into the tin and press out a little to the edges. Prick here and there with a fork and bake for 15-20 minutes until a pale biscuit colour. Remove and leave to go cold, then carefully spread with the jam to within 1cm of the edges.

Now make the topping: cream the butter and muscovado sugar together until light and fluffy. Beat in the lemon zest. Gradually beat in the beaten eggs, then fold in the flour and ground almonds. Dollop small spoonfuls of mixture over the jam and carefully spread it out in an even layer. Scatter over the blackberries, pushing half of them down into the mix.

Sprinkle over the tablespoon of demerara sugar and bake for 10 minutes. Carefully slide out the oven shelf, sprinkle over the flaked almonds and bake for another 30 minutes, or until golden brown and a skewer pushed into the topping comes out clean.

Remove, sprinkle with a little more demerara sugar and leave to cool in the tin before cutting into fingers.

Sour (Dough) Starters

I make bread quite often, in many forms. Flatbreads, pitta, pide, roti, pizza doughs, white loaves, rye and wholemeal loaves… I enjoy making all kinds of bread and love every aspect of the process because it’s hands on and you are dealing with a living thing with its own character. That goes double when dealing with sourdough, which uses a starter of water and flour energised by natural yeast in the atmosphere. A good sourdough loaf has a wide-open texture, with huge pockets of emptiness, a thick, chewy crust and a distinctly tangy flavour.

From time to time I have made and nurtured traditional sourdough starters – a process which, it has to be said, can be a bit of a faff – then I go away for a month or so, forget about it in the fridge, get engrossed in some other cookery (or DIY) project when I return, only to come back and find it has gone a bit horrible and beyond recovery.

Frustrated by my own inefficiency, I have tried various cheat’s sourdough recipes (all good, but most definitely NOT proper sourdough), and habitually start most of my doughs with a little flour and water and all of the sugar and yeast, and leave it for a couple of hours to allow it to develop a subtle tang that goes someway to replicating the special properties of sourdough. These are all things worth trying and developing as you become comfortable with using them. Lately though – the past six months or so – I have used a couple of halfway house starters that last in the fridge pretty well without turning bad, are dead simple to prepare, and only need occasional topping-up as they get used. The recipes are below, one each for a basic wheat starter and another for a rye starter.

We have homemade pizza every week, and I now always use one of these starters when I make the dough the night before, substituting the starter (which has the consistency of double cream) for around half of the water. It is impossible to give a precise measure of how much starter replaces how much water, it is just something you have to judge for yourself, which means this is a pizza dough that you have to mix by hand so you can judge when it has the correct balance. The same goes for regular loaves; no bread machines here, it’s time to work the dough by hand, and sweat. That’s what making bread is all about though, right?

Rye-sourdough.jpg


RECIPES 

Wheat Sourdough Starter – makes about 1 Litre

Day 1:

200ml lukewarm water

175g plain flour

1 tbsp honey

Day 3:

100ml lukewarm water

100g plain flour

Day 4:

100ml lukewarm water

100g plain flour


Rye Sourdough Starter – makes about 1 Litre

Day 1:

200ml lukewarm water

175g rye flour

1 tbsp honey

Day 3:

100ml lukewarm water

75g rye flour

Day 4:

100ml lukewarm water

75g rye flour


METHOD

To make either of the starters, on day one whisk the flour, honey and water in a large glass jar until it is a smooth mixture. Cover with clingfilm and let it stand at room temperature for two days.

On day 3 add the water and flour, whisk again until it is a smooth mixture and once again cover with clingfilm and let it stand at room temperature for another day.

On day 4 add the water and flour, whisk again until it is a smooth mixture and once again cover with clingfilm and let it stand at room temperature for one more day. After 24 hours you can now store it in the fridge where it seems to last pretty much indefinitely with the occasional stir to bring it all back together again (it will separate slightly over time).

When you have used around 2/3 of the jar, you can top it up by adding the appropriate quantities of the flour and water for whichever starter you are dealing with.

I told you it was dead simple…

Harissa Paste

Harissa is predominant in Tunisian cuisine, adding a sharp, hot, smoky hit to tagines, stews and soups, and can also be used as a condiment for grilled meat and fish – you can also use it to perk up a Bloody Mary!

There are endless variations on the recipe, the version I use has a good balance of spice, heat and flavour. Though there are excellent versions that you can buy in a supermarket, and I have probably used them all, once I made my own there was no looking back.

I make a good jar full, then portion it into an ice cube tray and freeze it so it’s always there to be used. It will also keep in a jar, in the fridge, for a good month or more.

Adjust the number of chillies according to your taste, de-seeding them if necessary. Bear in mind though that Harissa is supposed to be hot! This is best with home-made roasted peppers, because the smoky flavour is more pronounced. You can use jarred roasted peppers if you wish though, you could introduce more of a smoky flavour using a half-teaspoon of liquid smoke and some smoked sea salt, which is now widely available.

Harissa-Paste.jpg

RECIPE makes about 300ml

3 red peppers

1 tsp coriander seeds

1 tsp cumin seeds

1 tsp caraway seeds

30ml olive oil

1 small red onion, roughly chopped

6 hot red chillies, seeds in, roughly chopped

3 fat garlic cloves, roughly chopped

1/2 tbsp tomato puree

the juice of a lemon

1/2 tsp sea salt


METHOD

First roast the red peppers, by placing under a very hot grill on some baking foil (otherwise it gets messy!) for around 25 minutes, turning as the skin blackens. Transfer to a bag, seal it and allow to cool. Peel the pepper and discard the seeds.

Meanwhile, place a dry pan on medium heat and gently toast the coriander, cumin and caraway seeds for a couple of minutes until aromatic. Transfer to a spice grinder (I use a coffee grinder reserved for spices) or a mortar and pestle, and grind to a powder.

While the peppers are roasting, heat the oil in a frying pan over a medium-high heat and fry the onion and chillies for around ten minutes until dark and almost caramelised, adding the garlic for the final minute or two.

Transfer the peppers, onion mix and spices to a blender or food processor, with the tomato puree, lemon juice and salt, and process to a paste.

Store in a sterilised jar in the fridge, or portion into an ice cube tray and freeze.

To sterilise your jar: heat the oven to 140C/ gas 1 and wash your jar and lid in hot soapy water, rinse and let them dry out in the warmed oven. When you take them out to use them, keep your grubby fingers away from the insides of the lid and jar or you will undo your good work.

Fattoush

My wife lived in the middle east for a while, but even she thought that the dressing for this delicious chopped salad was unusual. One bite and she was converted though, the combination of buttermilk, vinegar and oil is rich, unctuous and delicious. I’m on a roll with Yotam Ottolenghi’s “Jerusalem” at the moment, and food like this is the reason why.

You can use bought (or made) buttermilk for this recipe, or you can mix whole milk and Greek yogurt (as detailed below) for a similar, less sour, version. This recipe uses both fresh and dried mint; they have very different flavours and contribute to the dance that this salad does on your taste buds.

51115620_fattoush_1x1

Image credit: Jonathan Lovekin

RECIPE serves 6 

200g Greek yogurt and 200ml full-fat milk (or 400ml of buttermilk)

2 large stale Turkish flatbread or naan (250g in total)

3 large tomatoes (380g in total), cut into 1.5cm dice

100g radishes, thinly sliced

3 Lebanese or mini cucumbers (250g in total), peeled and chopped into 1.5cm dice

2 spring onions, thinly sliced

15g mint

a bunch of flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped

1 tbsp dried mint

2 garlic cloves, crushed

3 tbsp lemon juice

60ml extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra to drizzle

2 tbsp cider or white wine vinegar

3/4 tsp coarsely ground black pepper

1 1/2 tsp salt

1 tbsp sumac or more according to taste, to garnish


METHOD

If using the yogurt and milk method, then at least three hours beforehand (or the day before, for a more rounded flavour) place both in a bowl and whisk well to combine. Cover, and leave in a cool place (or in the fridge) to develop. Little bubbles should eventually form on the surface.

Tear the bread into bite-sized pieces and place in a very large bowl with the yogurt/milk (or buttermilk) mixture, followed by the rest of the ingredients. Mix well and leave for between ten and thirty minutes at room temperature for the flavours to mingle.

To serve, drizzle over a little more extra-virgin olive oil and garnish generously with sumac.

Grilled Fish Skewers with Hawayej & Parsley

Another from Yotam Ottolenghi’s “Jerusalem”, this is a wonderful way to serve fish and is perfect for summer evenings in the garden.

Hawayej is a Yemeni spice mix which you will have to make yourself. It’s dead easy though, just a little grinding in a spice grinder or a mortar and pestle. The marinading stage is essential, try to allow 6 to 12 hours, though if you decide to make it late in the day then an hour will do.

fish1-blog.jpg

Image credit: Dev Wijewardane


RECIPE serves 4 to 6 depending on what you serve it with

Hawayej spice mix:

1 tsp black peppercorns

1 tsp coriander seeds

1 1/2 tsp cumin seeds

4 whole cloves

1/2 tsp cardamom seeds

1 1/2 tsp ground turmeric

For the fish:

1kg firm-fleshed white fish (cod, hake, monkfish, tilapia etc)

two bunches of finely chopped flat leaf-parsley

2 large garlic cloves, crushed

1/2 tsp chilli flakes

1 tbsp lemon juice

1 tsp fine sea salt

2 tbsp olive oil

lemon wedges to serve


METHOD

First, make the spice mix: place the whole spices in a spice grinder (I use a coffee grinder set aside for just this purpose) or a mortar and pestle, and work it until finely ground. Add the turmeric and mix well.

Remove the skin and any pin-bones from the fish, and chop into regular 2.5cm cubes.

Place the fish, parsley, garlic, chilli flakes, lemon juice and salt in a large bowl with the spice mix. Mix well with your hands, massaging the fish with the mixture until everything is well coated. Cover the bowl and place in the fridge for a minimum of one hour and a maximum of twelve.

When it comes time to cook them, thread the fish chunks on to skewers (metal or wood, but if using wood then soak them for an hour beforehand to avoid them scorching) and brush each piece of fish lightly on all sides with a little olive oil.

To cook: either place on a very hot ridged griddle pan for around 90 seconds, before turning and cooking for 90 seconds on the other side, or: grill under a hot, pre-heated grill (broiler) for around 2 minutes each side until cooked through. You can also cook them on a barbecue, taking great care not to burn them.

Serve immediately with lemon wedges. These go brilliantly with fattoush, the creamy dressing of which tempers and complements the spice perfectly.

Barley Risotto with Marinated Feta

The first bite we had of this resulted in a collective “wow”. It comes from Yotam Ottolenghi’s superb book “Jerusalem”, and though he has called it a risotto it doesn’t require the constant watching and stirring of an Italian risotto, instead it’s an all-in, one-pot dish that cooks like a stew. It’s delicious, simple and quick to make, there is no excuse for you not to try this one.

The revelation here is the addition of strips of lemon rind. They soften and mellow as they cook, and provide a sharp counterpoint to the richness of the barley. Likewise, the marinated feta adds another taste and texture that elevates this from the merely great to the truly wonderful. If you don’t like feta then try it this way, I’ll wager it will convert you.

rejcb0020007_b.jpg

RECIPE serves 4

200g pearl barley

30g unsalted butter

90ml olive oil

2 small celery stalks, cut into 5mm dice

2 small shallots, cut into 5mm dice

4 garlic cloves, cut into 2mm dice

4 thyme sprigs, leaves picked

1/2 tsp smoked paprika

1 bay leaf

the rind of a whole lemon, cut into strips

1/4 tsp chilli flakes

400g tin chopped tomatoes

700ml vegetable stock

300ml passata

1 tbsp caraway seeds

300g feta, broken roughly into 2cm pieces

1 tbsp fresh oregano leaves


METHOD

Rinse the pearl barley well under cold water until the water is no longer cloudy, and leave to drain. You can substitute pearl barley for pearled spelt if you wish.

Melt the butter and two tablespoons of the olive oil in a very large frying pan, or risotto pan, and cook the celery, shallot and garlic on a gentle heat for around 5 minutes, until softened.

Add the barley, thyme , paprika, bay, lemon rind, chilli flakes, tomatoes, stock, passata and 1/2 tsp of fine sea salt. Stir to combine, bring to a boil then reduce to the gentlest simmer possible. Cook for around 45 minutes, stirring frequently to ensure it doesn’t catch on the pan. When the barley is ready it will be tender with a little ‘bite’ and most of the liquid will have been absorbed.

While the risotto is cooking, gently toast the caraway seeds in a dry pan for a couple of minutes until aromatic. Then, using a mortar and pestle, lightly crush them so that some whole seeds remain. Add them to the feta with the remaining olive oil, mix gently to combine thoroughly, and set aside.

When the risotto is ready, check the seasoning and divide it between four shallow bowls, topping each with the marinated feta (including the oil) and a sprinkling of fresh oregano leaves.

In this hot weather our thyme was in full flower so I picked some off and added small flower heads to each dish as well. They were also delicious and added even more flavour.

Sea Bass with Roasted Fennel and Tomato Agrodolce

I spotted this Italian sweet and sour dish in an old Jamie Oliver magazine a couple of weeks ago. It looked simple (it is), uses ingredients that I know work together, and looked like an interesting twist on tradition. If you know Italian food then you know, of course, that the sweet and sour agrodolce is indeed traditional. I looked it up and it is used in a similar way to a French gastrique, adding piquancy to a dish. 

That’s just one more thing that I love about cooking: there’s always something new to learn. More than that, every new thing I discover takes me off down other hitherto uncharted avenues.

3c33148beb38f1826fecc79f6d7b9a18.jpg

RECIPE serves 2

1 medium fennel bulb (around 200g after trimming), finely sliced

2 tbsp olive oil

150g very ripe cherry tomatoes

3 fat garlic cloves, finely chopped

6 tbsp red wine vinegar

1 tbsp runny honey

50g fresh pine nuts

2 sea bass fillets, pin-boned

2 tbsp raisins


METHOD

Heat your oven to 220C/ 200C fan/ gas 7.

Remove the tough core from the fennel, trim off and reserve any fronds and slice it very finely, using a mandolin if you have one.

In a roasting pan. toss the sliced fennel in the oil with a little seasoning. Spread in a single layer in the roasting pan and roast for ten minutes.

Mix the vinegar and honey together, remove the pan from the oven and drizzle the vinegar over the fennel. Add the tomatoes, garlic and pine nuts, toss everything together and return to the oven for a further ten minutes.

Remove the pan from the oven again and switch the grill to high.

Using a very sharp knife, score the skin of the fish 4 or 5 times each, rub a little oil over the skin and season it lightly with sea salt. Toss the raisins into the roasting pan, lay the fish on top – skin side up – and grill for four or five minutes until the fish is just cooked through.

Take the roasting pan to the table and serve from it, alongside some crusty bread and a simple rocket salad.

Keralan Seafood Biryani

The list of ingredients for this delicious seafood biryani, from ‘Rick Stein’s India’, looks terrifying. Don’t be intimidated, everything required is easily available – if it isn’t already in your pantry – or is easily substituted. Also, there are only four basic processes to consider: make a spice paste; marinade some seafood; boil some rice and, finally, assemble and bake.

It’s the kind of dish you can bring out at a dinner party, or plonk on the table for a family meal, and everyone will think you’re a culinary genius.

It does take a little time, but if you have an hour free it’s no problem at all, and you’ll love it.

biryani

RECIPE serves 4

For the spice paste:

3 dried Kashmiri chillies, whole with seeds (or ordinary dried chillies)

1 star anise

2 tsp fennel seeds

2 tsp poppy seeds

1/2 tsp whole black peppercorns

5cm piece of cinnamon stick

10 garlic cloves, roughly chopped

5cm fresh root ginger, finely chopped

2 tbsp creamed coconut , grated from a block

4 tbsp ghee, or coconut oil, or vegetable oil

3 medium onions, finely sliced

a small handful of fresh or frozen curry leaves

1 tsp garam masala

1 tsp fine sea salt

3 tomatoes, roughly chopped

For the seafood:

400g large, raw, tail-on king prawns

150g firm white fish (cod, haddock, sea bass, tilapia etc)

75g squid, cut into rings

the zest and juice of a lime

1/2 tsp Kashmiri chilli powder, or 1/2 tsp regular hot chilli powder

1/2 tsp ground turmeric

1/2 tsp salt

For the rice:

350g basmati rice, soaked in cold water for an hour

6 green cardamom pods

2 bay leaves

To assemble and serve:

the juice of a lime

25g butter

a small bunch of mint leaves, chopped

a small bunch of coriander leaves, chopped

2 tbsp cashew nuts, dry-toasted


METHOD

First make the spice paste. You can do this well ahead of time if you wish, it makes the rest of the recipe much easier.

Heat a large, NOT non-stick frying pan over a medium heat and add the dried chillies, star anise, fennel seeds, poppy seeds, peppercorns and cinnamon stick. Dry toast for a minute or two until aromatic, then tip onto a plate and allow to cool for a minute or so before grinding to a powder. I use an electric coffee grinder to do this, but you can use a mortar and pestle.

Put the garlic, ginger and coconut into a food processor with the ground spice powder and 100ml of water. Process to a smooth paste.

Heat the ghee or oil in a large ovenproof casserole over a medium heat. Add the onions and fry gently for around 15 minutes until well-coloured, golden and just starting to catch here and there. Stir in the curry leaves, garam masala, salt and tomatoes. Cook for a further five minutes or so until the tomatoes have softened then add the spice paste. Fry for around 5 minutes until the sauce has darkened noticeably and the oil beings to separate, at this point the spices have ‘cooked out’ and are at their best. Add another 100ml of water and stir and scrape the bottom of the pan to reintegrate any bits that are stuck.

At this point you can leave it for a few hours, or overnight – re-heating it with a splash of water – or you can carry straight on…

Heat the oven to 160C/ 140C fan/ gas 3.

Cut the fish into rough squares and put into a large dish with the prawns and squid. Zest the lime over everything, then drizzle over the lime juice, than evenly scatter the chilli powder, turmeric and salt. The lime juice will start to ‘cook’ the fish, so don’t do this in advance.

Bring a large pan of lightly-salted water to the boil. Rinse the soaked basmati rice and add to the boiling water with the cardamom and bay. Cook at a stern simmer for between 2 and 6 minutes – the soaking will have softened the rice so it cooks very quickly. The rice should be soft at the edges, with the middle still being firm. Drain the rice – you can leave the cardamom and bay in it – and now start to assemble the dish.

Spoon the hot spice paste out of the casserole and into a bowl and, without cleaning the casserole, spoon half the rice into it. Put the spice paste back in on top of the rice, then put the seafood with all of the juice on top of the spice paste. Do not mix it through, this is a layered dish. Spoon the remainder of the rice over the top of the fish, squeeze over the lime juice, dot with the butter and cover the casserole with foil, followed by the lid.

Bake for 20 minutes, by which time the rice will have completed cooking and the seafood will be perfectly cooked. While it is cooking, put the cashews into a pan and dry-toast over a medium-high heat for a couple of minutes until they are golden.

Scatter over the chopped leaves and cooked cashews, and serve at the table in the casserole. Dig a big serving spoon in to get at all the layers, and serve alongside carrot salad.