Panzanella (Italian Bread and Tomato Salad)

It’s been a lovely summer here. Lots of warm evenings sitting outside eating great cheeses and amazing bread. There has been some cooking going on though, and once again I find myself apologising for not blogging for the longest time. In my defence: I’ve been busy eating lovely food and enjoying life.

The discovery of the summer for me has been the Italian bread and tomato salad, Panzanella. Dismissed by one family member as soggy bread salad, he was merely echoing my own expectations. When we actually tasted what I had made (courtesy of Claudia Roden’s ‘The Food of Italy) we very quickly revised our opinion, and now I find myself hoping I have some stale sourdough left over so I have an excuse to make it.

This is best made when tomatoes are at their ripest, so if you’re going to make it, make it now. The bread you use also makes a huge difference – ensure you use a slightly stale (one or two days old) sourdough or country loaf, with a good thick crust.

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Photo Credit: Scott Phillips

RECIPE serves 4

250g stale bread, cut or torn into rough chunks

600g ripe tomatoes, cubed

1 red onion, diced

1/2 cucumber, diced (peeled if you like)

2 stalks of celery, finely diced

1 clove garlic, crushed

1 small red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped

a handful of basil leaves, torn

2 tbsp red wine vinegar

5 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper


METHOD

Start with the tomatoes, and salt them in the bowl to encourage their juices to flow.

Now add all the other ingredients and stir well so everything is coated in everything else. Leave it to stand at room temperature for 30 minutes to allow the flavours to mingle and develop, check the seasoning, and that’s it!

For variation: you can take the crusts off the bread, which gives a more uniform but, I think, a less interesting texture. You can also lightly toast the bread beforehand. Try different ways of preparing the bread, and try different types of bread as well, the way you like it is the way it should be prepared.

You can further augment this with whatever takes your fancy and works: if you’re having it with grilled fish, for example, try zesting a lemon into it and using the juice of half a lemon in place of a tablespoon of the red wine vinegar. Or you could turn it into a summer vegan main course by slicing avocado into it. Let your imagination run wild, it’s how you discover lovely things.

Red and White Rice Salad, with Butternut Squash and Pomegranate

I quite often find myself with absolutely no idea what to make for dinner. Despite having approaching 850 cookery books, and my own notebooks containing close to a thousand tried, trusted and delicious recipes, I still scratch my head some mornings. When faced with such a conundrum, I will often turn to what is lurking in the fridge or the pantry and use what I already have as a starting point.

I picked up a beautiful pomegranate the other day. I had no idea what I would do with it but it was such a perfect fruit I couldn’t leave it there. I spotted it in our fruit bowl, and from there it was easy: pomegranate means salad, the developing summer leads me to middle-eastern flavours, and from there I just hit the books until I spotted this wonderful, hearty salad courtesy of Sabrina Ghayour’s ‘Bazaar: Vibrant Vegetarian Recipes’.

It is studded with interesting textures and flavours, and the combination of sharp vinegar, sweet orange and honey, together with warming cinnamon makes for a knockout fragrance. It is perfect as an accompaniment to falafels (which is how I served it), and I think it would also be perfect alongside grilled fish or shredded cooked chicken, with some pitta bread on the side. It is hearty enough to act as a vegetarian main course all by itself as well.

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RECIPE serves 4

1 small butternut squash, peeled, seeded and chopped into bite-size cubes

olive oil

2 tbsp cumin seeds

75g basmati rice

75g red Camargue rice

100g dried cranberries OR barberries

50g toasted flaked almonds

50g flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped

1 medium red onion, very finely diced

finely grated zest and juice of a large orange

1 tsp ground cinnamon

3 tbsp red wine vinegar

2 tbsp clear honey

extra-virgin olive oil

the seeds of a pomegranate

150g crumbled feta (optional)

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper


METHOD

Pre-heat the oven to 220C/ 200 C fan/ Gas 7.

Place the cubed butternut squash on a prepared baking tray and drizzle generously with olive oil. Scatter over the cumin seeds and season generously with salt and pepper. Using your hands, ensure everything is properly combined, spread out to ensure there is plenty of space for the squash cubes to roast properly, and cook in the middle of the oven for around 450 minutes until the squash is meltingly soft and just charring around the edges. If your honey is of the set kind, drizzle it over the hot squash now to melt and combine. Set aside to cool completely.

Meanwhile, cook the rice per packet instructions – in a separate pan for each type – until cooked but still slightly firm in the centre of the grain. This will take as little as five minutes for the basmati, and around 30 minutes for the red rice so keep an eye on things. Once cooked, rinse the rice thoroughly in cold water until completely cool, drain and set aside.

Put the cranberries (or barberries) almonds, parsley, onion and rice into a large serving bowl and mix well. Add the orange zest and juice, cinnamon, a generous glug (around 2 tbsp) of your best extra-virgin olive oil, the vinegar, the honey (if you didn’t use it earlier) and some salt and pepper. Mix well and taste for seasoning. Season carefully, adding more salt until the flavours are punchy – you may need more salt than you would expect.

A word on adding those liquids: the orange juice, vinegar and oil. Normally I would combine them in a small bowl and whisk together, then add the mixture as a whole. Adding them to the salad singly, as described above, somehow results in a less uniform distribution, no matter how well you mix the salad together. It means that every mouthful is different, sometimes startlingly so. It’s a new trick for me, one that I will think about whenever create a dressing in future.

Now add the butternut squash and pomegranate seeds and gently fold in, keeping the squash cubes intact. If you like, and depending on what you are having alongside this salad, you can crumble feta across the top as well for fresh, salty bursts of flavour.

Leave this covered, on the side at room temperature, until ready to serve.

Linguine with Salmon and Samphire

We are not hardened foragers in our house, though we do gather spring nettles for soup and beer, mushrooms (when we are 100% sure what we are faced with – we did a course and I highly recommend it if you want to pick and eat wild mushrooms and survive the experience), blackberries (of course) and many spring and summer greens such as wild garlic and wild leeks. There is still real abundance to be found, if you know what you are looking for.

Rule number one for a successful forager is: never tell anyone where you gather. If you do, then the chances are, when you visit next, the word will have got around and your spot will have been stripped bare.

The other day we were strolling along a fairly popular but rocky beach, when we spotted a small bunch of rock samphire. We were overjoyed and took only a couple of good handfuls. A little further along we were astonished to find another, bigger bunch, and beyond that it was growing in abundance – so much for leaving some behind for nature, we could have filled a carrier bag and still have left 95% of what was growing there. I still won’t tell you where we found it though…

Samphire comes in two main types: marsh samphire, which is like eating the sea and can be found on fish counters in supermarkets now, and rock samphire which is less salty but more citrussy. Either will do for this recipe, though the results will be quite different depending on which you use. The marsh samphire is more vibrant, whereas the rock samphire has an exquisite, delicate fragrance.

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RECIPE serves 4

approx 250g marsh or rock samphire

400g linguine or spaghetti

olive oil

a good knob of unsalted butter

4 salmon fillets

the zest and juice of a lemon


METHOD

Pick over and wash the samphire, roughly chop any large pieces, then set aside.

Pat the salmon fillets dry, season lightly and set aside for now.

In a large pan of lightly salted boiling water, cook the linguine or spaghetti per packet instructions until al dente, this will take around nine or ten minutes.

Meanwhile, heat a skillet or frying pan over a high-medium flame until hot (but not smoking), drizzle the pan with a little oil, pop half of the the knob of butter in the pan as well, add the salmon skin-side down and fry for around two minutes until the skin is crispy, basting all the while with the melted butter and oil. Don’t be tempted to try and move the fish around in the pan, this is the most common mistake when frying fish. Just leave it to sit in place, the skin will release from the pan when it is ready. Flip over and sear the other side for around 30 seconds, then remove from the pan and rest over kitchen paper until the pasta is ready.

Drain the pasta, leaving it wet with a good slick of the cooking water. Return it to the cooking pan and add the samphire and remaining butter with a generous grinding of black pepper. Toss well and then add the lemon zest and juice. Check the seasoning now, it makes a huge difference to the finished dish and you may need more salt than you think.

From here I like to serve the pasta in bowls with the whole salmon fillet on top – my wife likes the crispy skin. You can however remove the cooked skin and flake the salmon while the pasta is finishing (leave the flakes large) and toss through the pasta with the samphire if you prefer.

Served alongside a large bowl of rocket leaves, lightly dressed with  fresh lemon juice.

Spaghetti with Almond and Tomato Pesto

Yet another fast, delicious and simple recipe from Claudia Roden’s ‘The Food of Italy’.

The key to this dish is the tomatoes: obtain the ripest, freshest most aromatic tomatoes you can find, the results will make your taste buds tap-dance.

I find that the amount of sauce made from this recipe is twice the amount that you need to feed four people (as a main dish), but it doesn’t work as well if you halve the ingredients. So, make it as is and freeze half – it freezes really well and loses almost nothing as long as you use it within a couple of weeks.

To make it vegan choose wholewheat pasta and omit the Parmesan.

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RECIPE serves 4

500g ripe tomatoes

75g blanched almonds

3 fat garlic cloves, crushed

a large handful of basil leaves

1/4 tsp dried chilli flakes

100 ml extra-virgin olive oil

1 tsp caster sugar

400g spaghetti (or linguine or bucatini)

finely grated Parmesan to serve, if liked


METHOD

At least an hour before you plan to eat, make the pesto: leave the tomato skins on, but remove the hard white pit where the stalk sits. Quarter the tomatoes and add to a food processor with the almonds, garlic, basil and chilli flakes. Blend to a rough puree.

Add the oil, sugar and a generous pinch of salt, blend briefly then tip into a bowl and allow to sit at room temperature until you need to use it.

Cook the pasta according to the packet instructions, until al dente. Drain the pasta, but not too thoroughly, leave a little of the cooking water clinging to the pasta. Check the seasoning of the sauce, then toss the pasta and sauce together. Finish with a generous grinding of black pepper.

Some people (like me) like to finish this dish with a little finely grated Parmesan, others (like my wife) prefer to savour this dish as it is – try it both ways and see which you prefer.

Serve alongside a simple salad of rocket leaves dressed with freshly-squeezed lemon juice.

Tagliatelle with White Truffle

I have been curious about truffles for a long time, but I have never laid hands on a fresh truffle. I have tried various truffle-infused oils, but they have always been disappointing – to say the least.

I spotted this recipe in Claudia Roden’s ‘The Food Of Italy: Region by Region’ and I had to try it, so I tracked down a jar of minced white truffle online. It was expensive, but worth every penny.

I have made this three times in recent weeks, the jar of minced truffles that I bought was big enough to make ten servings and once opened it will only keep for a short time, with a layer of oil to protect the exposed truffle, in the fridge. Each time I have made it, tweaking as I go, it has got better.

It turns out that there is a very good reason why truffles are highly prized: they are delicious. Describing the taste is impossible, but I have see them described as musky and earthy, and that fits well. This is the basic recipe, but you could easily add some lightly fried mushrooms – fried in the butter and oil in the recipe below – or some chopped black olives tossed in at the end. The next time I make it I will try some black garlic with it, the possibilities are limited only by your imagination.

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RECIPE serves 4

60g unsalted butter

a generous glug of best-quality olive oil (not extra-virgin)

40g grated Parmesan

a grating of nutmeg

300g tagliatelle or fettuccini pasta

several teaspoons of minced truffle, taste as you go and add more if you need to. OR, if you are lucky enough to get hold of a truffle – especially the more aromatic white kind – shave it thinly and stir it through the finished dish

1 garlic clove, peeled and crushed


METHOD

Cook the pasta according to the packet instructions, until al dente.

Meanwhile, gently melt the butter in the oil, then finely grate in a little nutmeg – about a third of a nut – and set aside for a few minutes.

Finely grate the Parmesan, and crush the garlic.

Drain the pasta, but not too thoroughly. Leave a little cooking water on the pasta to help the sauce. Toss the pasta with the nutmeg-infused oil and the Parmesan, then add the truffle and garlic with a generous grinding of black pepper. The garlic goes in raw and will cook only very slightly in the sauce. It will give you breath issues the next day, but it’s worth it – the combination of flavours is amazing.

Serve alongside a simple green salad.

Nasi Goreng (Indonesian Fried Rice)

I’m a poor blogger. I’m sorry, it has been a long time since I last wrote anything, I can only blame it on life getting in the way.

Life does get busy, sometimes even thinking about what to make for dinner is too much. What you need in these cases is a quick, easy and delicious meal. Nasi Goreng is it: it is endlessly adaptable – all you definitely need are the sauce ingredients and some pre-cooked rice, for the rest of it you can use what you’ve got in the fridge and any leftover meat or fish. You can also top it with a fried egg if you like.

It’s all about the sauce. The quantities given below are for two people, so scale it up to suit however many people you are serving – and make sure you scale up the quantity of the sauce or it will be too widely dispersed and lose its impact.

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RECIPE serves 2

a quantity of rice, pre-cooked and allowed to cool completely

2 tbsp groundnut oil

1 tbsp unsalted butter

2 shallots, finely chopped

2 cloves garlic, sliced

2 red chillies, seeds left in, finely chopped

100g button mushrooms, thinly sliced

2 medium carrots, finely diced

your choice of soft vegetables: mange tout, fine beans, bell peppers, peas, sprouting broccoli, baby sweetcorn – whatever takes your fancy or that you have waiting to be used up. Chop them into bite-sized pieces.

For the Sauce:

2 tbsp kicap manis (Malay soy sauce)

1 tsp hot paprika

2 tsp tomato puree

2 tbsp chilli bean sauce


METHOD

First, cook the rice and leave it to cool. I don’t give quantities for the rice because everyone differs in what they believe to be a serving size, so cook what your own experience tells you that you will need. If serving rice for dinner, I always cook much more than I need so I can make this, or other fried rice dishes the day after.

Tip: Back in the days when I could only manage to cook a small handful of simple dishes, the one and only thing that I could cook well was rice. In my hands it always had perfect bite coupled with softness, each grain was distinct and separate from its neighbour and there was no hint of stodginess. Then it all went wrong.I learned that the way I cooked rice was incorrect. I convinced myself that I should be using exact volumes of rice and water, cooking for exact times, sealing pan lids, leaving it to sit for ages, using tea towels as steam absorbers – the more instructions I followed, the more I got away from the simple pleasures of cooking rice simply, the worse my rice got.

My wife was in despair; “you have lost your rice mojo” she told me. Eventually I did the sensible thing and went back to cooking my rice the wrong way, and now it’s perfect again.

In my world, you put your rice in the largest pan you have and cover it in a lot of cold water, at least an inch of water over the level of the rice. Season the water with a very little salt and over a high heat bring the water up toward boiling point. Before it actually boils, turn the heat right down so that the water settles into a very gentle simmer. This will prevent the rice grains from bursting.

The time it takes your rice to cook can differ greatly, so check your rice after 3 or 4 minutes at the simmer and check it every minute thereafter. Your grains should be soft but with a definite firmness to the grain. Overall, your pan of rice should emerge as clean, distinct grains that will be a pleasure to eat.

Now make the sauce, simply combine all the ingredients in a small bowl with a little vegetable oil, stir well and set aside.

Prepare all of the ingredients you will be using. This is a stir-fry so everything happens quickly when the heat is on, you need everything ready to just tip into your wok.

In a large wok, melt the butter with the groundnut oil over a high heat. When it is hot (not quite smoking), add the shallots and garlic and – keeping everything moving all the time – cook for about a minute until the garlic is just starting to colour. Add the sauce, then immediately add all of your vegetables. This will cool the oil a little, so the danger of burning the garlic is minimised. Keeping everything moving, cook for a few minutes more until the vegetables are just cooked, hot through but retaining their bite.

If you are adding pre-cooked meat or fish, now is the time to add it and give it a quick flash of heat.

Now add the rice and, keeping the heat on, stir and fold it all around until all of the rice is coated in the sauce and has turned a pleasing red.

Serve immediately, topped with a fried egg if you like.

I like to make this with raw king prawns, which I put into the wok with the sauce, but before the vegetables go in. I give them a minute or two in the heat, until they just turn pink, then I take them out and set them aside while I complete the dish. The part-cooked prawns go back in with the rice, and they finish cooking while the rice takes in the heat.

To make it vegetarian or vegan, forgo the butter and use tofu (or just the veg!).

Sicilian Chips

When you have discovered that you like something a certain way, it can be a struggle to do it any other way. That’s certainly the case in my house; if we have chips then we have chips with fennel seeds. However, I spotted this recipe in Katie and Giancarlo Caldesi’s ‘Sicily’, and it looked too good not to make – so I didn’t tell anybody what I was making, presenting it as a fait accompli. It was a good move, this is absolutely delicious and I can see it being a regular request from now on.

Cut the chips small, about as thick as your little finger, don’t overdo the tomatoes (they release too much moisture in the oven, which hinders the chips from getting crunchy) and be generous with the black olives. Olives with the stones still in taste infinitely better that without, but don’t go the the effort of removing the stones – the cooked olive flesh is meltingly soft and comes off the stones easily so leave it to your dinner companions to do it themselves.

We had this with pan-fried sea bass fillets, but it would work well with any firm white fish (cod, hake, tilapia, even monkfish if you’re pushing the boat out) or salmon.

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RECIPE serves 4

750g floury potatoes (i.e. King Edwards, Roosters, Maris Piper), peeled and cut into chips

2 red onions, cut from root to tip and cut into wedges

2 tsp dried oregano

150g cherry tomatoes, cut in half around the equator

a generous handful (or two) of black olives

a generous glug of olive oil

sea salt and freshly-ground black pepper


METHOD

Preheat the oven to 200C/ 180C fan/ Gas 6.

Put the chips into a large pan of cold, lightly salted water and bring to the boil. When just boiling, reduce to a steady simmer and cook for two minutes. Drain in a colander, and allow most of the surface moisture to steam off.

meanwhile, line a couple of large baking trays with parchment paper, toss all the ingredients together in a large bowl and divide between the two baking trays. Do not crowd the trays, allow plenty of room between the different elements so they can roast properly.

Cook for 35-45 minutes until you can’t resist the smell anymore, the chips are golden brown and the onions are just starting to catch and caramelise. Transfer to a warm serving dish and serve immediately alongside your choice of fish and a big pile of rocket leaves.

Ribollita

This soup has no right to be as good as it is, given that the ingredients are basically cabbage, beans and potato. That it is so good is down to the first cooking stage, the soffritto, which creates the heady flavour-base from which this traditional Italian peasant food sings.

It is a perfect winter soup: delicious, aromatic and filling. Served alongside toasted crusty bread it is a meal in itself, and it’s even better if made a day ahead. Though it may seem strange to use three different kinds of cabbage, the contrast between them is startling: the white cabbage is sweet, whereas the kale and cavolo nero are slightly bitter.

Served in a traditional Tuscan way, the soup is finished in the oven layered with bread. To serve it this way, slice some crusty farmhouse or sourdough bread as thick as your index finger, toast it lightly and rub each slice with a cut garlic clove. Using a casserole or similar ovenproof serving dish, ladle a layer of soup in the bottom of it, top with a few slices of bread followed by another layer of soup. Continue until both the soup and the bread is used up and cook in a 180C/ gas 4 oven for 20-30 minutes until the soup is piping hot and the bread has soaked up all the juices.

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RECIPE serves 6-8

For the soffritto:

6 tbsp olive oil

1 medium carrot, finely chopped

1 large onion, peeled and finely chopped

1 large celery stalk, finely chopped

4 fat garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

2 tsp fine sea salt

a good grinding of black pepper

a large handful of flat-leaf parsley, leaves and stalks, finely chopped

the leaves from a sprig of rosemary, finely chopped

For the soup:

250g potatoes, any kind, chopped into 2cm dice

250g white cabbage, shredded

400g cavalo nero leaves (stalks removed)

100g curly kale (tough stalks removed)

2 tins of cannellini beans

1 litre chicken or vegetable stock, plus the water from the cannellini bean tins

To serve:

crusty farmhouse or sourdough bread, toasted and rubbed with garlic

6-8 spring onions, roughly chopped (optional)

a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil


METHOD

In a large, heavy-bottomed pan, cook all the soffritto ingredients (except the garlic) over a medium heat for around 15 minutes, stirring occasionally until softened and aromatic, add the garlic for the final 2 or 3 minutes of cooking. Don’t be tempted to skimp on the oil, it seems a lot but it is crucial to the final flavour and texture, and only works out at a tablespoon per serving.

Add the potatoes and shredded white cabbage and cook for a couple of minutes, stirring frequently, until the cabbage starts to wilt. Add the cavolo nero and kale to the dish and stir through.

Add the stock and water from the cannellini bean tins, bring to the boil then turn down to a steady simmer and cook for around 30 minutes until the vegetables are cooked through and the potato is just tender. Take one tin of the beans and set aside, the other tin should be mashed with a little of the cooking stock to form a thick paste.

When the soup is cooked, add the bean paste and the whole beans and cook for a further ten minutes to heat the beans through and thicken the soup. Correct the seasoning and either serve straight away alongside the bread, put it in the oven Tuscan-style (as above), or leave it to cool ready to eat the following day.

The chopped spring onions are a traditional Tuscan garnish, scattered over the top when serving, but you can omit them if you wish. Don’t omit the final swirl of extra-virgin olive oil over the top though, it adds a lush silkiness to the finished dish.

Sweet Potato and Broccoli Soup

We nearly always have soup available in our house; you never know when somebody might drop in, or when hunger pangs will bite. There are times though when I get caught out and I have to whip up something delicious in a hurry.

I was introduced to this unpromising-sounding but actually quite delicious soup by my sister-in-law. It’s one of Jamie Oliver’s, and the secret is no secret at all: use the freshest ingredients you can get your hands on. Oh, and harissa. Harissa is THE ingredient that lifts that soup from run-of-the-mill to exceptional. Make your own if you can, my recipe is here and it’s far better than anything you can buy in a supermarket.

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RECIPE serves 6, extremely generously

1 tbsp olive oil

1 large onion, roughly chopped

2 fat garlic cloves, crushed

500g sweet potato, chopped into 2cm cubes

750ml (approx) chicken or vegetable stock

200g broccoli, stalk chopped and florets detached

2 tsp harissa


METHOD

In a large pan, gently fry the onion in the oil for ten minutes until lightly golden.

Add the garlic and cook for a further minute, then add the sweet potato and broccoli stalk. Stir thoroughly then add the stock, sufficient to cover everything. Bring to the boil then simmer for 10 minutes until everything is almost tender, then add the broccoli florets and cook for a further 5 minutes.

Using a stick blender (or a jug blender, but be careful of the hot liquid) blitz the soup until smooth, adding a little more water or stock to loosen it if necessary. Season to taste.

Stir the harissa through the soup just before serving, alongside crusty sourdough.

Tomato and Anchovy Risotto

This recipe was devised by Luke Holder, co-head chef (with Angela Hartnett) at a 5 star hotel in Hampshire. You would therefore expect it to be stunning, and it is. He calls it an ‘umami tsunami’ thanks to the intensity of the tomato, ramped up by the anchovy drizzle with which it is finished. The quality of the anchovies is key, so buy the best you can find, and afford.

I present it here exactly the way he wrote the recipe. It needs no embellishment.

This is high-end cooking, which is well within the reach of the home cook. Try it, you’ll be impressed with yourself!

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RECIPE serves 4 

For the risotto:

1 very large onion, finely diced
250ml of chicken or light vegetable stock
250g of risotto rice (I use carnaroli)
190ml of white wine (or vermouth)
500ml of passata
125g of butter, cubed
100g of Parmesan, grated
olive oil

For the drizzle:

12 top quality anchovies, chopped
50ml of Cabernet Sauvignon vinegar
50ml of extra virgin olive oil
2 fat garlic cloves, peeled and sliced
a small bunch of flat-leaf parsley, chopped


METHOD

To make the risotto, add a glug of oil to a large pan over a medium heat. Add the onion and cook gently until softened but not coloured. Meanwhile, heat the stock in a pan over a low heat.

Add the rice to the onions and stir. Toast until the rice is extremely hot, then deglaze with the wine. Remove from the heat and allow to sit for 5 minutes.

Marinate the chopped anchovy fillets in the vinegar, garlic, olive oil and chopped parsley. Set aside.

Return the risotto to the heat, add 2 ladles of stock and bring to a simmer while stirring continuously, until the stock has been absorbed. Keep cooking like this, adding one ladle of stock at a time, until it is all soaked up.

Pour in all of the passata and continue cooking, adding a little more water if necessary, until it has been absorbed and the rice is cooked through. Beat in the cubed butter and grated Parmesan and remove from the heat – it should be nice and glossy. Cover with a lid and allow to settle for around for a few minutes. You will notice that no salt has been added; with the Parmesan and anchovies none is required.

Serve the risotto and pour the marinated anchovies all over the top – this will have a large amount of oil over the top but it is key to the finishing off the dish, so do not skimp!