Indian Spiced Potatoes with a Crispy Fried Egg

Eggs and potatoes, yum. Eggs and curry, yum. Eggs and potatoes and curry, yum yum yum!

I made this for the first time last Sunday for lunch, then again on Monday, and yet again last night (Tuesday) as a side dish with a curry feast. I think it’s fair to say that I love it, that my family loves it, and I bet you will too.

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RECIPE – Serves 4

800g floury potatoes (Maris Piper, Roosters etc) peeled and diced into 1cm cubes

6 tbsp rapeseed oil

1 tsp black mustard seeds

2 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped

a fat thumb of ginger, finely chopped

1 tbsp curry powder

1/2 tsp turmeric

25g unsalted butter

6 spring onions, trimmed and finely chopped

1 long green chilli, finely chopped

1/2 tsp coarse sea salt

1 tsp nigella seeds

4 large eggs

a small handful of curry leaves


METHOD

First, prepare the potatoes: bring a large pan of salted water to the boil, add the diced potatoes and simmer gently for 13 mins or until just soft. Drain in a colander and set aside while you prepare the spice base.

Mix the curry powder and turmeric with a little water to make a paste. This will prevent the spices from sticking and burning when added to the pan.

Heat 2 tbsp of the oil in a large frying pan then add the mustard seeds. Cook over a medium heat until they just start to pop then add the garlic, ginger and curry powder/turmeric paste. Cook for 30 seconds or so, stirring constantly until aromatic, then add the butter.

When the butter has melted, add another tablespoon of oil and the potatoes. Fry for 5 mins, turning often and taking care not to allow the potatoes to disintegrate.

Add the spring onion, chilli and salt top the pan, stir and toss together for a minute or so then scatter the nigella seeds over the top, mix and transfer to warmed plates while you cook the eggs.

Line the base of a large frying pan with baking parchment, as you would if you were lining the base of a cake tin. Drizzle 2 tablespoons of oil over the top of the parchment, heat the pan, break the eggs on top and fry for a couple of minutes until thoroughly cooked and the bottom of the eggs are starting to crisp. This is a great way to cook a fried egg under any circumstances.

Place an egg on top of each mound of spiced potato, heat a tablespoon of oil in the frying pan and add the curry leaves. Fry for a minute or two until dark and glossy, drain on kitchen paper and serve on top of the eggs.

Vietnamese Beef Curry

Because my wife is vegetarian I very rarely eat red meat, I don’t miss it because the vegetarian meals that we eat are delicious, and so I will eat steak perhaps once a year, and if I don’t, well… I don’t. After discovering this recipe though, I may well eat it more often.

I came across this recipe in Bill Granger’s excellent ‘Easy’ and I was intrigued to learn how Vietnamese curries differ from the Indian and Thai curries that I am so familiar with. The ingredients are all familiar, just in unfamiliar combinations: Indian curry powder (home-made of course), fish sauce and coconut milk. Rather than being served alongside the more usual rice, this beef curry is served with crusty French bread, a culinary echo of the long French history in the region. The combinations work perfectly together: the creamy coconut milk tempers the chilli heat, the fish sauce together with the beef stock adds a deep umami flavour, and I could eat the gravy-soaked bread all day.

My apologies to all those who like to read the vegetarian and vegan recipes I post here, but this meat dish was just too good to leave out. Normal service will soon be resumed…

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RECIPE – Serves 4

1kg rump steak, cut into 4cm cubes

1 onion, peeled, halved and finely sliced

4 fat garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

a fat 3cm knob of ginger, finely chopped

2 tbsp curry powder

1 tsp turmeric

1 tbsp caster sugar

2 tbsp rapeseed oil

500ml beef stock

3 tbsp fish sauce (nam pla)

8 birds-eye chillies, left whole but slit down one side

2 carrots, peeled and sliced

500g potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks

400ml tin of coconut milk

1 long baguette


METHOD

Preheat the oven to 160C/ Fan 140C/ gas 3.

Toss the beef with the onion, garlic, ginger, curry powder, turmeric and sugar, then season well with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Ensure the meat and onions are fully coated. Seasoning the meat while it is raw is important, as it can more easily take up the seasoning at this point.

Cover and chill in the fridge for 15 minutes.

Heat the oil in a large shallow casserole dish over a high heat. Add the beef, in batches, and cook until it is browned on all surfaces. Remove and set aside once it has browned, while you cook the rest.

*Tip: Browning meat doesn’t seal it, as many think. Instead, searing over high heat caramelises the surface of the meat, which enhances the savoury flavour and fills the finished dish with complex layers of nutty caramel and coffee-like bitterness. This is called the Maillard Reaction and it is what makes meat quite delicious. Without searing, meat dishes can taste flat and boring.

Return all of the browned meat to the casserole, together with all the onions and spices, and add the stock, fish sauce, chillies, carrots and potatoes. Bring to the boil on the stovetop, then cover and transfer to the oven.

Cook for approximately 2 1/2 hours, or until the meat is meltingly tender. Add the coconut milk 30 minutes before the end of the cooking time.

Serve immediately with crusty bread and a big smile. I’m going back for second helpings now…

Thai Yellow Fish Curry with Coconut Rice

There are some dishes that encourage you to eat far more than you should, this is one of them. A rich, creamy yet – relatively – healthy mild Thai curry that is so moreish it should be a controlled substance. It’s the combination of coconut milk and rice, it is as warm and comforting as a hug from your mum.

As an added bonus, it’s almost as quick to make as a stir-fry, without all the chopping. It’s my new favourite dish.

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RECIPE – Serves 4

2 tbsp groundnut oil

2 tbsp yellow curry paste

1 tsp ground coriander

1 tsp ground cumin

1/2 tsp ground turmeric

400ml tin of coconut milk

1 tbsp fish sauce (nam pla)

1 tbsp soft brown sugar

6 kaffir lime leaves

300g green beans, trimmed into 3cm lengths

600g thick white fish fillets (cod, hake, haddock etc), skinned and cut into bite-sized pieces

For the coconut rice:

400ml tin of coconut milk

175ml cold water

400g long-grain rice

To garnish:

chopped coriander leaves

mild red chillies (optional)


METHOD

First, make the coconut rice: combine the coconut milk, water and rice in a saucepan, bring to the boil then reduce the heat to minimum, cover and simmer very gently for 12-14 minutes until the liquid has been absorbed. At this point, cover the rice again and set to one side for ten minutes while you start making the curry.

Place a large wok or frying pan over a medium-high heat and add the oil, when hot add the curry paste, coriander, cumin and turmeric. Stirring constantly, fry for a minute then stir in the coconut milk, fish sauce, sugar and lime leaves, then add the green beans with 50ml water.

Bring to a simmer and cook for 3 minutes, then gently add the chunks of fish and cook for a further 3 to 5 minutes, until the fish is just cooked and starts to flake. Serve alongside the coconut rice and your choice of garnishes.

Yellow Curry Paste

Curry paste is ridiculously easy to make, yet is unimaginably better than anything you can buy from a supermarket. It freezes well and will last for months, so you can make a batch as in the recipe below, divide it into portions of 2 tablespoons each, put into a freezer bag and you’ll always have the makings of a fast and delicious mild Thai curry.

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RECIPE – Makes approximately 5 servings

1 tsp white peppercorns

1 tsp coriander seeds

1/2 tsp cumin seeds

1 tsp coarse sea salt

2 tsp ground turmeric

1 tsp curry powder

1 lemongrass stalk, white part only, chopped

1 tsp dried chilli flakes

1 yellow pepper, de-seeded and chopped

1 small red onion, peeled and chopped

5 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

a 3cm knob of fresh ginger, finely chopped

2 tbsp groundnut oil


METHOD

Heat a small saucepan over a medium heat (NOT a non-stick pan), add the peppercorns, coriander and cumin seeds and dry-toast for a couple of minutes until fragrant. Be very careful not to burn them, turn them out onto a plate to cool before grinding to a powder in a coffee grinder reserved for that purpose, or in a mortar and pestle.

Place all the ingredients in a food processor and pulse until you have a thick, bright yellow paste. Easy!

Rainbow Bhajis

Oh my goodness.

I love onion bhajis, especially home-made, so when I spotted these variations in an old BBC Good Food magazine I just had to try them. I say again: Oh my goodness.

Subtly spiced, gorgeously colourful, easy to make and great as a starter or party snack, these little beauties have become a must-make alongside any and every curry I ever make.

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RECIPE – feeds 6 as a starter/side dish

For the batter:

4 tbsp curry powder

250g gram flour

1 tsp baking powder

1 tsp cumin seeds

1 tsp ground cumin

1 tsp ground coriander

1 tsp garam masala

¼ tsp hot chilli powder

2 medium onions, thinly sliced

For the bhajis:

140g carrot, grated

2 tsp nigella seeds

100g parsnip, grated

2 tbsp desiccated coconut

small pack coriander, stalks only, finely chopped (use the leaves to garnish)

140g beetroot, grated

2 tsp fresh ginger, grated

1l sunflower oil, for frying

lemon wedges, to serve

lime wedges, to serve


METHOD

First make the batter, stir the curry powder into a little cold water to make a paste, then top up to a total of 250ml of cold water. Mix the flour, baking powder and spices in a mixing bowl, make a well in the centre, then pour in the curry water and gradually stir together to a smooth batter. Stir in the onions, then divide the batter evenly between three bowls. Leave the batter to relax for 30 minutes or so.

Stir the carrot and nigella seeds into one batch of batter, the parsnip, coconut and chopped coriander stalks into another, and the beetroot and ginger into the third.

Heat the oil in a fryer, a deep pan or a non-stick wok to 180C, or until a piece of bread browns in 20 secs. Starting with the parsnip and ending with the beetroot, add spoonfuls of the mixture to the oil, a few at a time, and cook for a few mins, turning occasionally until evenly browned and crispy. This will take about 4 mins. Lift out onto kitchen paper with a slotted spoon, sprinkle with a little salt and keep warm in a low oven while you cook the rest.

Serve the hot bhajis scattered with coriander leaves alongside lemon and lime wedges for squeezing over.

Red Lentil Tikka Masala

Having provided you with a recipe for masala paste it would be remiss of me not to give you a quick and easy recipe that – I guarantee – once you have made it once you will return to again and again.

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RECIPE – feeds 3 easily

2 tsp groundnut oil

1 red onion, finely diced

2 tbsp masala paste

1 garlic clove, peeled and crushed

1 tin chopped tomatoes

250ml passata, or vegetable stock

200g red lentils, rinsed

200g spinach leaves

to serve: natural yogurt, if desired


METHOD

Heat the oil over a medium heat and gently saute the onion for five minutes until softened. Add the garlic and cook for a further minute before adding the masala paste. Cook on for a minute or two, stirring constantly, to release the aromas of the garlic and masala paste, then add the tomatoes and passata or stock.

Bring to the boil, reduce to a simmer and add the lentils. Simmer for approximately 30 minutes until the lentils are tender but still holding their shape. Remove from the heat and add the spinach leaves, stirring them well into the sauce so that they wilt.

If this is a little too hot for anyone, a little natural yogurt stirred in will temper the heat.

This is great served with chapatis or wholemeal rotis.

Masala Paste

If you look through this blog you will notice that I make quite a lot of spicy food, I can’t help myself, I love it. Some find working with spice quite scary, as if it is a dark art, or they look at the ingredients list for an authentic curry and move on because it is so long. Actually, if you follow a trusted recipe exactly then spice is extremely easy to cook with, and of course the more you cook with it the more you will understand it.

To cut out some of the preparation I always have a stock of pre-made pastes in the freezer. They freeze extremely well and the flavours intensify the longer you leave them. This is one of my favourites, a flavour-packed, vibrant paste that isn’t too hot. It is great used anywhere a recipe specifies a store-bought masala or balti paste.

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RECIPE – Makes 8 tbsp

1 tsp cumin seeds, dry-fried and ground

1 tsp coriander seeds, dry-fried and ground

2 tsp garam masala

2 tsp dried chilli flakes

2 tsp sweet smoked paprika

a big thumb of fresh ginger, finely chopped, or 2 tbsp minced ginger

1 tbsp groundnut oil

2 tbsp tomato puree

a handful of fresh coriander, leaves and stalks

sea salt and freshly-ground black pepper


METHOD

First, dry-fry the cumin and coriander seeds in a heavy bottomed pan for a minute or so until they give off a delicious aroma, allow to cool then grind well using a mortar and pestle or a coffee grinder reserved just for grinding spices.

Combine all the ingredients in a food processor and blitz until you have a smooth puree. The coriander won’t chop up finely enough to disappear but that’s no problem.

Chaat Masala

The one ingredient that most Indian snacks, street foods, roasted and fried food and salads rely on for their instant zing and spicy sparkle is Chaat Masala. This spice mix is a blend of spicy, salty and tart flavours and is usually added to the food after cooking and right before serving. It is one of the secret weapons of your local Indian restaurant.

Usually a good sprinkling of a tablespoonful (or more, experiment with it) over the prepared dish and a good stir through to combine is all that is needed. Chaat Masala adds an unbelievable edge to the flavour. Some of the ingredients are a little esoteric, like the ground black salt, but are well worth tracking down online if you cannot find them in your nearest international food store.

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RECIPE – makes a small jarful

3 teaspoons toasted cumin seeds, ground

1 teaspoon toasted coriander seed, ground

1⁄2 teaspoon toasted fennel seeds, ground

4 teaspoons amchoor powder (powdered dried mango)

3 teaspoons ground black salt (or ordinary salt if you really can’t get it)

1⁄2 teaspoon ground black pepper

1 pinch asafoetida powder

1 teaspoon garam masala

1⁄2 teaspoon ground ginger

1⁄2 teaspoon Carom seeds

1⁄4 teaspoon ground dried mint

1⁄4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1⁄4 teaspoon paprika


METHOD

First, dry-toast the cumin, coriander, fennel and carom seeds in a heavy bottomed pan for a minute or so until they give off a delicious aroma, allow to cool then grind well using a mortar and pestle or a coffee grinder reserved just for grinding spices.

Combine all ingredients, and store in an airtight container in a cool dark place.

Simple as that!

Chana Masala

Indian restaurant food has the undeserved reputation of being unhealthy. I struggle to understand how this has come about, when you examine the ingredients used in freshly-made Indian food and compare it to the ingredients list of any ready-meal or processed foodstuff it is immediately plain which option is the healthier.

Admittedly, I have had (poor) Indian meals in the past that have been swimming in ghee, but that’s bad cooking, not bad cuisine.

Chana Masala is one of my favourite healthy foods; the chick peas are stuffed full of fibre, protein, trace minerals and vitamins, while the spices are a smorgasbord of antioxidants. It’s very filling, so you don’t have to eat much to feel satisfied, and because it is a ‘dry’ dish if you ever see any oil then you know it has been poorly prepared.

I worked my way through a great many recipes for this, tweaking and testing along the way, until I finally came up with this perfect copy of the unbeatable chana masala that my local Indian restaurant serves up.

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RECIPE – serves 4

250g dried chickpeas, soaked overnight

1 tbsp flour

1 tbsp fine sea salt

1 tsp bicarbonate of soda

1 bay leaf

2 cinnamon sticks

2 tbsp ghee (or vegetable oil if making vegan)

2 large onions, halved and finely sliced

4 garlic cloves, finely sliced

a large thumb of fresh ginger, cut into matchsticks

1 long green chilli, finely chopped (remove the seeds if you don’t want the extra heat)

1 tsp cumin seeds

1 tbsp ground coriander

1 tsp ground cumin

2 tsp paprika

1 tsp turmeric

1 1/2 tsp garam masala

1/4 tsp cayenne pepper

1 tin of chopped tomatoes

a pinch of sea salt

250ml cold water

1 lemon, zest and juice

2 tsp golden caster sugar

a big handful of fresh coriander, chopped


METHOD

The evening before, soak the dried chick peas in plenty of water (they will absorb a lot) with 1 tbsp flour, 1 tbsp fine sea salt and 1 tsp of bicarbonate of soda, stir well and set aside.

The next day, rinse the chick peas well, there should be no salt left on them. Put into plenty of water with the bay leaf and cinnamon sticks and bring to the boil, then simmer for 60-90 minutes until they are soft and tender, skimming off any scum if necessary. You may need to add more water as it evaporates. If you have a pressure cooker it will save you a lot of time, cook as per the instructions for your device (mine takes around 25 minutes).

Drain and set aside, removing the bay leaf and cinnamon sticks.

If you are using tinned chickpeas, use two tins; you won’t need the flour, salt, bicarbonate of soda, bay leaf or cinnamon sticks.

Heat the ghee (or oil) in a large pan, when hot cook the onion over a low heat for 10-15 minutes until softened but not coloured, then turn the heat up and cook for another couple of minutes until they are lightly browned. Make a paste out of the ground coriander, ground cumin, paprika, turmeric, garam masala and cayenne pepper by putting them into a small bowl and adding a little water. Set aside for now.

Add the garlic, ginger, chilli and cumin seeds, turn the heat off for a moment and stir thoroughly in the hot pan for a couple of minutes. Turn the heat back on and add the spice paste. Cook on for a minute, stirring so everything is thoroughly coated, then add the tinned tomatoes and a pinch of sea salt. Stir thoroughly again, add the water, bring to the boil then add the drained chickpeas. Simmer gently for as long as it takes to reduce the sauce to a thick and sticky consistency.

At this point you can leave the chana masala to sit for a few hours until you are ready to eat. Giving it time will intensify and soften the flavours.

When ready to eat, warm the chana masala gently and add the sugar. Just before serving stir through the lemon zest and juice, top with a little garam masala and fresh coriander. Garnish with onion salad and a birds-eye chilli lightly fried in a little ghee.

This is great served alongside Basmati rice, naan bread and carrot and ginger salad or carrot salad with cardamom, ginger and lemon.

Chicken Madras

It’s not often that I cook a meat dish, my wife is vegetarian so if I am going to indulge myself then I need to ensure that I cook something alongside it that she will enjoy as well. Last night I really fancied a Chicken Madras, not just because I had a yearning for curry, but also because I really enjoy making curries – it’s the alchemy of all the spices coming together, get it right and a curry really comes alive on your tastebuds.

Of course, making one curry dish meant that I had to make at least one other curry dish, and I ended up cooking a veritable feast. Channa Masala (chick pea curry, the recipe for which I will post in a day or two), Bombay Potatoes, carrot and ginger salad and naan bread. I spent a very enjoyable afternoon in the kitchen, a treat as it isn’t often I get the chance to devote so much time to cooking.

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RECIPE – serves 2

4 long red chillies

4 boneless, skinless chicken thighs

4 tbsp ghee

1 medium onion, finely chopped

3 fat garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

1 tin of chopped tomatoes

2 heaped tsp ground cumin

2 heaped tsp Kashmiri chilli powder (or 2 tsp paprika and 1/2 tsp hot chilli powder)

1 heaped tbsp garam masala

1 heaped tsp ground turmeric

1 tbsp caster sugar

1 tsp flaked sea salt

fresh coriander leaves to garnish


METHOD 

Finely chop two of the chillies, and cut a long slit from stalk to tip on each of the others. Leave all the seeds in, this is a curry that needs a good amount of chilli heat. Chop each of the chicken thighs into eight bite-sized pieces. Put all the spices, salt and sugar into a small bowl and add a little water, mix to a paste and set aside – doing this prevents the powdered spices from burning when added to the hot pan.

Melt the ghee in a large pan or wok, over a medium-high heat. Gently saute the onion with a pinch of salt for ten minutes or so until soft and translucent – the salt helps to liberate the water in the onion and prevents it colouring too quickly. When the onion is soft, add the garlic, chopped chillies and spice paste, turn the heat up and stir-fry for a minute or so until aromatic. Add the chicken thighs and whole, slit chillies and cook on for a couple of minutes, keeping the pan moving so the spices do not burn and the chicken is coloured all over.

Now add the tinned tomatoes, bring to the boil then reduce the heat and simmer for 7-10 minutes until the chicken is just cooked through and the sauce has thickened.

Serve immediately alongside Basmati rice and garnished with coriander leaves.

Thanks are due to the Hairy Bikers for this one – two men who love a good curry and know how to cook it!