Mauritian Curry Powder

The Mauritian version of curry powder is subtly but discernibly different from an Indian curry powder blend. Freshly made is always best, but this will keep in an airtight jar in a cool, dark place for a month without losing its vitality.

powder.jpg

RECIPE – Makes 10 tablespoons

40g coriander seeds

40g cumin seeds

20g fennel seeds

10g fenugreek seeds

1/2 small cinnamon stick

15 dried curry leaves

3 tsp dried chilli flakes

20g powdered turmeric


METHOD

Add the coriander seeds, cumin seeds, fennel seeds and fenugreek seeds to a very large, unheated frying pan (NOT non-stick). Over a medium-high heat, dry toast the seeds until they are aromatic. Keep a close eye on them, the line between toasted and burned is a fine one.

Tip the seeds onto a broad plate and allow to cool.

Using a coffee grinder (one set aside exclusively for grinding spices) grind the toasted seeds with the cinnamon stick, curry leaves and chilli flakes; you will probably have to do this in batches. Add the turmeric to the ground spices and mix thoroughly.

Store in an airtight jar in a cool, dark place.

 

Simple Roti

These simple, unleavened flat breads have no business being as delicious as they are. They are extraordinarily filling as well.

roti.jpg

RECIPE – Makes 10

300g plain flour

4 tbsp vegetable oil

1 tbsp fine sea salt

150ml water


METHOD

Combine all the ingredients in a large mixing bowl to form a soft dough. You may need to add a little more water, or a little more flour; the dough should be pillowy and slightly (but not excessively) sticky.

Leave it to rest in a lightly oiled bowl, covered with a damp cloth, for 30 minutes.

Divide the dough into ten equal balls, and on a lightly-floured surface press the balls into rounds as thin as you can make them.

Cook them, one at a time, on an extremely hot skillet very lightly brushed with oil, for 1 minute each side.

Keep warm, wrapped in a tea towel, in a very low oven until they are all cooked and you are ready to serve.